These are the cities with the biggest carbon footprints

Cities UN 2018.jpgThis article is brought to you thanks to the strategic cooperation of The European Sting with the World Economic Forum.

Author: Emma Charlton, Writer

Tackling the global emissions problem might be more manageable than it first appears.

Thinking about worldwide production of greenhouse gases can boggle the mind and make the scale of the problem seem unfathomable. But a new study showing 18% of all global emissions come from just 100 cities demonstrates how local action can meaningfully reduce pollution.

Seoul in South Korea topped a list of carbon footprints of 13,000 cities compiled by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Guangzhou in China, with a population of 14 million, came second on the list, followed by New York City.

Image: Global Gridded Model of Carbon Footprints

Los Angeles, Singapore, Chicago, London and Dubai also featured in the top 20.

Concentrated power

Researcher Daniel Moran said he was surprised at how carbon footprints are concentrated into a small number of dense, high-income cities and affluent suburbs. And that might make curbing the absolute levels seem more achievable, with the power in the hands of a relatively small number of local mayors and governments.

Image: Global Gridded Model of Carbon Footprints

In more than half of the 187 countries assessed, the top three urban areas were responsible for more than 25% of all national emissions.

The worst offenders

On a per capita basis, Hong Kong topped the list, followed by Mohammed Bin Zayed City and Abu Dhabi in the UAE. Four Chinese cities made up the top 10 per capita, as well as the US cities of New Orleans and Detroit.

Hong Kong was the only city to appear in the top 10 on an absolute and per capita basis. It has responded to the Paris Agreement – which aims to ensure the global average temperature doesn’t rise beyond 2°C, compared to the pre-industrial level – by setting out plans to lower carbon emissions by 2030.

And the new report could be interpreted as good news globally, after US President Donald Trump disappointed environmental campaigners by announcing the US withdrawal from the Paris accord. Still, some comfort may be drawn from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s report, which suggests mayors and citizens, rather than national governments, are on the frontline in the battle to stem emissions.

“The confluence of high concentration of global GDP and global carbon footprints augurs well for future development of innovative strategies to reduce footprints,” the researchers said. “The fact that carbon footprints are highly concentrated in affluent cities means that targeted measures in a few places and by selected coalitions can have a large effect covering important consumption hotspots.”

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Featured Stings

1.1 billion people still lack electricity. This could be the solution

A Sting Exclusive: “One year on from the VW scandal and EU consumers are still in the dark”, BEUC’s Head highlights from Brussels

Eurozone set to abandon monetary and incomes austerity and adopt growth friendly policies

Parliament approves key directive regulating professional qualifications

Eurozone: Sovereign debt decreases for the first time since 2007

The US bugged Europe: Is this news?

The role of public affairs in student NGOs

World Health Organisation and young doctors: is there any place for improvement?

Dangers of poor quality health care revealed ‘in all countries’: WHO report

Google strongly rejects EU antitrust charges and now gets ready for the worst to come

Impossible Brexit options: WTO or new referendum?

EU Commission closer to imposing anti-dumping duties on Chinese solar panel imports?

Global Citizen-Volunteer Internships

Militias force nearly 2,000 to leave Libyan capital’s largest shelter for internally-displaced: UNHCR

EU-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement sees the light as Moscow’s reaction once more looms

EU Ambassadors in the EP: a multilateral approach to global challenges needed

We know ethics should inform AI. But which ethics?


Re-thinking citizenship education: bringing young people back to the ballot box

EU to spend €135.5 billion in 2014 or 6.5% less than this year

Presentation of Juncker’s Investment Plan: Can 315 billion euros save the EU?

The EU bows to Turkey in view of the talks for a political settlement in Syria

Gender disparity in salary and promotion in medicine: still a long way to go

Why is Grexit again in the news? Who is to pay for Eurozone’s banking problems?

At epicentre of Indonesia disaster, Guterres praises resilience of Sulawesi people

Google’s hot summer never ends: EC to launch ANOTHER antitrust inquiry against the American giant

Brexit: PM May must hush Boris Johnson to unlock the negotiations

Internet of Things: a Force for Good or Evil?

Deal on protecting workers from exposure to harmful substances

UN rights office appeals for peaceful Zimbabwe elections amid reports of intimidation

Cancer research put at risk by General Data Protection Regulation? The possible dangers of a data privacy EU mania

Shinzō Abe, on the right, and Jean-Claude Juncker at EU-Japan Summit in Tokyo last week. (Copyright: European Union, 2018 / Photo: Etienne Ansotte)

EU and Japan ratify first FTA ever to include Paris Climate Agreement provision

Women’s leadership ‘critical’ to future of Niger

Worldwide terror attacks have fallen for the third year in a row

The Council unblocks all EU budgets

These are the 3 key skill sets workers will need to learn by 2030

EU finally agreed to cut roaming charges in 2017 but criticism is always there

Trump to run America to the tune of his business affairs

Why the World Cup is a bit like international trade

EU and Indian flags at EU-India Summit in New Delhi last October (copyright EU 2018, Source: EC - Audiovisual Service)

India and the EU get close to revive talks on proposed Free Trade Agreement

Trump’s trade war splits the EU; Germany upset with Juncker’s “we can be stupid too”

How a possible EU budget deficit affects the migration crisis

Berlin favours economic and social disintegration in certain Eurozone countries

Vegans in France are using extreme tactics to stop people eating meat

Sustainable Infrastructure and Connectivity in the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI): a stimulating China-EU dialogue at European Business Summit 2018

How and why Mercedes fakes the EU fuel consumption tests

Europe’s far-right launches attacks on neighboring nations

Syria: Civilians bear brunt of unilateral sanctions, exacerbating ‘unparalleled suffering, destruction,’ says UN expert

The widely advertised hazards of the EU not that ominous; the sting is financial woes

ECB to people: Not responsible if you lose money on Bitcoin, your governments are

The decline of our oceans is accelerating, but it’s not too late to stop it

OECD: Mind the financial gap that lies ahead

Athens searches frantically for a new compromise between politics and economic reality

EU confronts environmental threats as global leaders attempt to revive the global sentiment at NYC climate week

Eurozone: There is a remedy for regional convergence

€5 billion of EU energy efficiency project money spent on “comfort”

EU/Africa, Caribbean and Pacific: towards which partnership?

Will Cameron succeed in keeping UK inside the EU and reverse the present economic downturn?

Human Resources Information Systems Specialist Trainee – 2013

Germany is the world’s most innovative economy

Young and unemployed the perfect victims of ‘vultures’

More Stings?

Comments

  1. Meeting International is elated to invite you to International conference on Earth Science and Climate Change. This will be held on September 6-7, 2018, at Zurich, Switzerland.
    For more information go through the link: https://www.meetingsint.com/conferences/earthscience

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s