Why will Paris upcoming “loose” climate change agreement work better than the previous ones?

Participation of Miguel Arias Cañete, EU Commissioner for Energy and Climate Action, at the INDC Forum organised in Rabat, Morocco (EC Audiovisual Services, 13/10/2015)

Participation of Miguel Arias Cañete, EU Commissioner for Energy and Climate Action, at the INDC Forum organised in Rabat, Morocco (EC Audiovisual Services, 13/10/2015)

It was only last Tuesday when the European Commission (EC) together with the Moroccan government, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) convened at the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) Forum in Morocco to discuss the overall effect of countries’ contributions to the climate agreement which is going to be concluded in December at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris. The outcome of the Forum was that a global climate effort is greatly increasing but more endeavours are needed in order to reduce global warming in fact.

The European Parliament (EP), in view of the COP21 next month, convened two days ago and voted in favour of a global agreement that can fight climate change by targeting mainly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and increase the relevant climate finance commitments.

As far as Europe’s contribution is concerned, it is certain that we are on the right track, with the United Kingdom (UK) to lead the way. Not only UK announced a £5.8bn climate finance pledge but also has reduced the carbon intensity of its economy more than the rest 20 biggest economies in the world (G20). Furthermore, France and Germany are following the race in carbon intensity cuts and in climate finance pledges, strengthening the EU commitment in the fight against climate change.

However, the new anticipated climate agreement is not going to include punishment measures or sanctions for the countries that will not be in line with the targets. This decision was clearly made due to the unwillingness of many member states to legally bind to it.

Recognition for a long-term climate approach

The INDC Forum though brought together around 200 experts from different backgrounds and all stressed the need for further and stronger commitments if we want to tackle the climate change issue. Particularly, Miguel Arias Cañete, EU Commissioner for Climate Action and Energy mentioned: “The initial contributions on the table make a significant difference, but these alone will not be enough to keep global warming below 2 degrees. That’s why in Paris we need to agree a long-term goal to guide our efforts, a process for taking stock of the progress made and raising ambition, and robust transparency and accountability rules. The new deal must show to the world that governments are united, determined and serious when it comes to fighting climate change.”

EP puts pressure on the EU for a legally binding agreement

The EP will be represented by 15 Members who will go to Paris to urge for commitments on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions to 80-95% below 1990 levels by 2050 and raise up the financing attributed to climate up to $100bn a year by 2020. The Parliament will also focus on the transportation which is the second-largest sector producing greenhouse gas emissions and will try to persuade the member states to implement measures that will be able to reduce emissions through the participation of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

UK: EU’s climate panache

Even though UK’s finance pledge is smaller than the German or the French one, UK has managed to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, per dollar of economic output, by 10.9% in 2014 according to a relevant report published by the accounting firm PWC. That was accomplished mainly by reducing burning coal.

What is more, energy-related emissions dropped by 8.7% while the economy experienced a 2.6% growth. The latter reveals that economies can grow at a fast pace while targeting at the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, which can lead to the desired goal of limiting the temperature rise since preindustrial times to 2 degrees Celsius.

Further efforts in a loose regime; will it work?

The Paris agreement is going to be concluded in less than two months but under a framework that will probably not impose “punishments” to the parties which do not comply with the rules. This is also supported by Christiana Figueres , head of the U.N. Climate Change Secretariat who pointed that: “ The overwhelming view of member states is that any agreement has to be much more collaborative than punitive, if it is to happen at all. Even if you do have a punitive system, that doesn’t guarantee that it is going to be imposed or would lead to any better action.”

But is this the case or is it too difficult (not to say impossible) to impose sanctions to the parties that fell short to the climate commitments? According to Yvo de Boer, the UN’s former top climate official, the Kyoto Protocol “was to be legally binding, but it became very clear that a lot of countries didn’t want sanctions” and weren’t imposed any when violating or abandoning the agreement.

Consequently, we end up to a Protocol that has to reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically over the next decades and keep global warming temperature under the 2 C barrier, but with no legal bindings whatsoever. Is this going to work at all?

The next meeting regarding the climate agreement is to be held in Born on 19-23 October and is the last gathering before the major COP21. This is the last chance for all parties to assemble a beneficial and realistic plan to be sealed in Paris. The European Sting will be monitoring the matter closely.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Featured Stings

UNICEF delivers medical supplies to Gaza in wake of deadly protests

Eurozone: Uncertain future with unemployment ravaging the South

Ukraine-EU deal sees the light but there’s no defeat for Russia

High-flyers: China is on top of the world for skyscraper construction

Can the US-Iran rapprochement change the world?

Bram in Colombia

Sweden well ahead in digital transformation yet has more to do

Refugees now make up 1% of the world’s population

EU: Centralised economic governance and bank supervision may lead to new crisis

The hostilities in south and eastern Ukraine resume; where could they lead?

Draghi’s ‘quasi’ announcement of a new era of more and cheaper money

YO!Fest back in Strasbourg for the 2nd edition of the European Youth Event – 20-21 May 2016

The right approach to addressing overcapacity problem from a Chinese perspective

Commission goes less than mid-way on expensive euro

Fed, ECB take positions to face the next global financial crisis; the Brits uncovered

Why the euro may rise with the dollar even at lower interest rates

Eurozone at risk of home-made deflation and recession

German stock market is not affected by the Greek debt revolution while Athens is running out of time

It’s not your imagination, summers are getting hotter

Superbugs: MEPs advocate further measures to curb use of antimicrobials

TTIP wins first crucial EU test: MEPs give in to the trade agreement

Hostilities in Syria’s southwest, mean cuts in vital aid across Jordanian border: Senior UN official

Air quality: Commission takes action to protect citizens from air pollution

We’ll succeed together

Eurozone closer to a deflation – stagnation trap

This robot has soft hands. It could be the future of sustainable production

ILO warns of widespread insecurity in the global labour market

The European Youth raises their voices this week in Brussels at Yo!Fest 2015

UN chief applauds Bangladesh for ‘opening borders’ to Rohingya refugees in need

The European Sting Cookie Policy

‘Immense’ needs of migrants making perilous journey between Yemen and Horn of Africa prompts $45 million UN migration agency appeal

IMF’s Lagarde: Ukraine must fight corruption

‘Habitual residence’ rules deprive EU workers from social benefits

At Ministerial session, UN regional office in Beirut to focus on technology for sustainable development

Fostering intergenerational solidarity and cooperation through age-friendly environments: the right answer to Europe’s demographic challenge

Cameron postpones speech in Holland

Digital business is Europe’s best hope to get back to growth

Parmesan cheese on shelves in Italy (Copyright: European Union, 2014 / Source: EC - Audiovisual Service / Photo: Daniela Giusti)

CETA at risk again: Italy says it won’t ratify EU-Canada trade deal over product protection fears

If we can build the International Space Station, ‘we can do anything’ – UN Champion for Space

CHINA UNLIMITED. PEOPLE UNLIMITED. RESTRICTIONS LIMITED

COP21 Paris agreement: a non legally-binding climate pact won’t stop effectively global warming while EU’s Cañete throws hardest part to next Commission

Politics needs to “Youth UP” in order the ensure the future of our democracies

Berlin wants to break South’s politico-economic standing

Migration: Commission steps up emergency assistance to Spain and Greece

Merkel refuses to consider the North-South schism of Eurozone

UN chief welcomes ‘first concrete step’ in normalizing Eritrea-Ethiopia relationship

A young person’s perspective on the Paris and Beirut attacks and aftermath

Eurozone in trouble after Nicosia’s ‘no’

The end of the 404? Why we need to repair the internet’s crumbling infrastructure

JADE Romania Celebrates the 4th Anniversary

Why growth is now a one way road for Eurozone

European Commissioner for Youth wants young people to be at heart of policy making

China and China-EU Relations in the New Era

Only the Americans are unhappy with the ceasefire agreement in eastern Ukraine

The Stray

China in my eyes

Charles Michel advocates a strong Europe that acts where it can add real value

UN warns of ‘deteriorating climate’ for human rights defenders in Guatemala

Shinzō Abe, on the right, and Jean-Claude Juncker at EU-Japan Summit in Tokyo last week. (Copyright: European Union, 2018 / Photo: Etienne Ansotte)

EU and Japan ratify first FTA ever to include Paris Climate Agreement provision

G20 LIVE: G20 Antalya Summit in Numbers, 15-16 November 2015

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s