A European student just sets the question of the day: What kind of education policies are missing in Europe?

European Youth Insights is a platform provided by the European Youth Forum and the European Sting, to allow young people to air their views on issues that matter to them. The following entry is written by Arif Shala,  doctoral student at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany.

Arif Shala is a a doctoral student at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany and executive director at the Institute for Economic Development Studies in Prishtine, Kosovo.

Arif Shala is a a doctoral student at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany and executive director at the Institute for Economic Development Studies in Prishtine, Kosovo.

The present economic crises is challenging education and training systems of Europe in two major ways. First is the matter of investing in growth policies, a vital part of which are education and training policies, with the pressing issue of consolidating public finance. Additionally, youth unemployment has reached 23.2% which EU structures cannot tolerate to continue. In the economic sense, education and training exert influence on innovation and productivity which is why it is a source of growth and contributes to the employment of population, including youth.

A half of member states have stopped investing in education and training while the current crises urges them to strengthen the results of education and training systems as well as intervene by making systems relevant to labor market needs. Recent studies which evaluate the impact of investment in education are arguing for a better match between education and world of work. In changing policies the responsibility lies with national governments however the EU structures offer significant support. The year 2014 marked the beginning of the new support scheme. The new Erasmus+  program 2014-2020 which is now the only education, training, youth and sports program of the EU has been subject to a 40% increase in its budget amounting to more than 14 billion Euros.

The pie chart below shows the allocation in percentage of the Erasmus +  program 2014-2020 funds. A 77.5% of the funds, which in the mean time constitute the vast majority of funds, are allocated to education and training. Youth programs have received 10% of the funds, which is followed by student loan facility (3.5%), national agencies (3.4%), administrative costs (1.9%), Jean Monnet (1.9%) and finally a 1.8% has been allocated to sport.

pie

It is evident from the chart above that Erasmus+ will concentrate most of its funding in education and training.  This scheme will finance the mobility of 3.59 million students/vocational students/volunteers/lecturers and education staff between 2014 and 2020. Between 2014 and 2020, 11.3 billion Euro will be invested in improving the education and training landscape in Europe. Within this scheme the majority of funds, 4.8 billion, is allocated to higher education ( please see table below).

table

The second most important sector has been considered the VET- Vocational Education Training which will benefit 2.5 billion. This sum will be used to increase the employability and life skills of vocational learners. Schools will be able to spent 1.7 billion in reducing early school leaving, improving learning of basic skills and the establishment of the eTwinning, the online community offering support for teachers, pupils and school leaders.

A sum of 569 million will be used in programs addressing adult education which will be used to improve and modernize adult education programs, encourage cooperation with different sectors and evaluate the utility of non-formal and informal education. Finally, 1.7 billion Euro will be allocated to programs as needed.  Europe is spending a lot of money in education but the same problems remain. In my opinion the three factors that are not being considered are the ones that will make the difference.

Applying new technologies in education and training

The new technologies offer many ways to make learning effective, engaging and inclusive. First, these developments make it possible for education to reach more people at a lower cost. This form of learning can easily be made creative and innovative, but Europe is not using the potential of new technologies to meet the needs of learners. Technology can offer access to quality education and promote individual learning.

In the last years we have seen the emergence of MOOC, known as Massive Open Online Courses, which offer unlimited access to courses provided in the web. Unfortunately, studies show that many professionals in European universities do not even know what MOOCs are, and only 9 European Universities are involved in such initiatives. In order to encourage this form of learning EU structures are considering recognizing the competencies learnt online.

Enhancing digital competences

In order for all individuals to benefit from engaging, effective and inclusive learning more should be done to enhance their digital competencies. Gaining access to this form of learning is conditional upon possessing certain technological skills. Many experts are arguing that the “right” skills for the 21 century are the digital competencies. It is a reason to worry that only 30-35 % of students in EU countries are digitally confident.

Higher education and its components are changing fast and radically by globalization and technological developments. In my opinion this is emphasizing the ability of learners to respond to an ever changing environment by continuously learning. It is expected that the demand for higher education will continue to increase and Europe will have to learn how to respond to this demand as well as how to respond to the competition with other educational powers.

Learning styles

Learning should take place beyond the typical teaching environment and should thus focus on not just the knowledge but also in developing the skills necessary to continue benefiting and learning from experience.  In line with this it should be noted that the pedagogy underneath the concept of experiential learning is one that benefits greatly the organizations assuring that employees learn what businesses want them to learn consequently, experiential learning has been linked to positive impacts in the workplace.

This theory postulates that there are four types of learners: accommodative, convergent, divergent and assimilative. The differences between learners lie on the way they obtain and process information. Many assessment inventories are readily available and can be used to identify learning styles in all settings. It is my argument that if we fit instruction to learning needs of students/participants outcomes will be higher.

Accounting for differences in learning styles will result in providing students with more freedom in terms of choosing course objectives, content, and activities as well as how much time is allocated to each.

About the author

Arif Shala is a a doctoral student at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany and executive director at the Institute for Economic Development Studies in Prishtine, Kosovo.

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Ukraine: Temperatures plunge amid rising humanitarian needs

FROM THE FIELD: Urban Mexico moves toward better livelihoods, cleaner cities

Why we need to solve our quantum security challenges

MEPs debate EEAS report on disinformation activities related to COVID-19

Wide-ranging reforms needed to ensure Italy’s economic recovery

Carbon neutrality and funds for EU programmes are EP priorities for EU summit

Google’s hot summer never ends: EC to launch ANOTHER antitrust inquiry against the American giant

A new Europe for people, planet and prosperity for all

Should we be worried about third-hand smoke?

This electric plane has flown successfully for 30 minutes – is this the future of flying?

How supporting climate action on a local level can transform the world

MEPs approve €585 million to support refugees from Syria

New rules to help consumers join forces to seek compensation

World ‘not yet on track’ to ensure children a better future: UN rights chief

The global appetite for meat is growing, and it’s harming the planet

Easing ‘classroom crisis’ in Côte d’Ivoire, brick by (plastic) brick

Finland, Switzerland and New Zealand lead the way at teaching skills for the future

Safe spaces offer security and dignity for youth, and help make the world ‘better for all’: Guterres

CO2 emissions on the rise for first time in four years, UN agency warns

Is 2019 the beginning of the end for coal in Europe?

INTERVIEW: UN’s top official in North Korea foresees ‘surge’ in humanitarian aid

Parliament’s interparliamentary delegations established

Can the whole world live in peace?

Coronavirus: 5 ways to work from home with your kids (and stay sane)

5 things you need to know about water

Trump goes ahead with plan to undo globalization; targets China and EU

Coronavirus could trigger a hunger pandemic – unless urgent action is taken

This is where teachers are paid the most

No better year for the EU’s weak chain links

Bring killers of journalists to justice: UN agency seeks media partners for new campaign

Traffic congestion cost the US economy nearly $87 billion in 2018

UN lauds special chemistry of the periodic table, kicking off 150th anniversary celebrations

A Sting Exclusive: “Climate change-the biggest global health threat of the 21st century, yet overlooked in climate negotiations?” IFMSA wonders from COP21 in Paris

How trade tariffs could help combat climate change

Human Rights breaches in Russia, Afghanistan and Burkina Faso

Security Council imposes arms embargo on South Sudan

Australian homes are turning to solar power in record numbers

European Business Summit 2014 : The Sting Report, Day II – Business, Politics and EBS 2015

Nuclear test ban treaty critical to global collective security – UN chief

Generation Z will outnumber Millennials by 2019

Reforms in Lithuania are reinforcing economic growth but boosting productivity is still a challenge

EU Elections: new rules to prevent breaches of data used to influence elections

‘Violence, atrocities and impunity’ reign throughout Libya, ICC prosecutor tells UN Security Council

Governments must act to help struggling middle class

5 ways companies can support their remote workforce

Worldwide consumer confidence has shot up to its highest level for four years according to a survey of 130 Global Retail leaders

Low quality healthcare is increasing the burden of illness and health costs globally

Robots aren’t stealing all our jobs, says the World Bank’s chief economist

Ireland’s planning to make its Emerald Isle even greener

How the Great Famine inspired Irish people to help Native Americans in the fight against COVID-19

How the inventor of the internet plans to make it safe and accessible for everyone

JADE Spring Meeting 2015- Europe’s Junior Entrepreneurs together for 4 days of networking, workshops and forward thinking

Few countries are pricing carbon high enough to meet climate targets

The different ways of care: Is there a general rule to follow?

UN forum spotlights cities, where struggle for sustainability ‘will be won or lost’

5 key themes for reforming the EU, as elections loom

How to make later life happy, healthy and meaningful

“A Junior Enterprise is run only by students.. there are no professors or managers that can help you solve your problems”

Libya detention centre airstrike could amount to a war crime says UN, as Guterres calls for independent investigation

UN chief calls for ‘green and clean’ development in message for Africa Industrialization Day

More Stings?

Advertising

Comments

  1. Thank you so much your blog lists are very helpful to me.

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s