How does globalization impact and save the world of COVID-19?

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This article was exclusively written for The European Sting by Ms. Maria Tereza Trindade Teixeira and Flávia Gabriela Tojal Hora, two second-year medical students at the Universidade Tiradentes, Brazil. She is affiliated with the International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), cordial partner of The Sting. The opinions expressed in this piece belong strictly to the writers and do not necessarily reflect IFMSA’s view on the topic, nor The European Sting’s one.


Covid-19 has irreparably changed our world, if there was a more practical way of demonstrating that we live in a globalized world, now this reality seems to be well understood. With the speed of access to information and ease of access to other nations, the virus seems to have come into people’s lives long before it actually contaminated the first individual in each country.

The impacts that this deeply developed connection has brought herald alerts to our way of life as a society, as well as enlighten us about the paths to be followed.

In this sense, it is a fact that life habits in a globalized world have a total correlation with the scope of covid-19 in this pandemic. Starting with the urban invasion, which leads to a closer proximity to animals, which increases the chances of transmission between species. In addition, it is also important to highlight the massive amount of humans living side by side in cities, which contributes greatly to the speed of spread of the virus.

Moreover, international travel, made possible by a world that is irreversibly connected, emerges as the main point of being the cause of the pandemic as a term by its own definition. 

Unfortunately, all these pieces lined up in a deadly chess that was played around the world, but which, like almost all problems, affected the poorest populations more significantly, as the world may even be globalized, but money definitely does not.

Less income is synonymous with lower access to quality health, greater exposure to precarious housing, more adverse conditions to acquire protective materials (such as mask and alcohol), as well as more daily stress and less chance of care for pre-existing comorbidities.

However, belonging to a globalized world is not only a disadvantage when talking about the pandemic, since new habits and likely solutions can be discussed around the world. 

For the future, modern perspectives of individual and collective care with hygiene to prevent the spread of the virus have been discussed and applied, as well as a scientific exchange of techniques and knowledge has been promoted among more advanced countries in terms of vaccination with those countries of medium to low socioeconomic level that need to promote the vaccine among its inhabitants with greater intensity.

Therefore, it is necessary to understand that the paths taken by covid-19 are intrinsically correlated to a world that is more globalized at every moment, and that this fact, despite presenting itself as great responsible for dissemination, also emerges as a light on the path of a world that needs to find in the union its greatest driver in the face of a path that leaves behind the pandemic,  mainly acting among those who find themselves on the poorer side of the spectrum. 

Thus, it is necessary to understand that we are the only beings who lived on Earth during this troubled period and it is our duty to learn from him so that we can improve as a society and so that this scenario will no longer be repeated.

REFERÊNCIAS

1. Thoradeniya T, Jayasinghe S. COVID-19 and future pandemics: a global systems approach and relevance to SDGs. Globalization and Health. 2021 May 21;17(1). 

2. Palakiko D-M, Daniels S-A, Haitsuka K, DeFries K, Kamakawiwo’ole S, Tolentino NK, et al. A Report on the Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Health and Social Welfare of the Native Hawaiian Population in Hawai’i. Hawai’i Journal of Health & Social Welfare [Internet]. 2021 Sep 1 [cited 2022 Dec 27];80(9 Suppl 1):62–70. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34661129/

3. Basavaraja GV, Chandrasekar S, Bansal A, Gupta D, Parekh BJ, Kamath SS, et al. IAP Guideline on Practicing Safely During COVID-19 Era: Clinics and Small Establishments. Indian Pediatrics [Internet]. 2021 Apr [cited 2021 May 10];58(4):383–90. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8079844/pdf/13312_2021_Article_2201.pdf

4. Du L, Wang M, Raposo VL. International Efforts and Next Steps to Advance COVID-19 Vaccines Research and Production in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Vaccines. 2021 Dec 29;10(1):42.

About the author

This article was exclusively written for The European Sting by Ms. Maria Tereza Trindade Teixeira and Flávia Gabriela Tojal Hora, two second-year medical students at the Universidade Tiradentes, Brazil. They are affiliated with the International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA), cordial partner of The Sting. The opinions expressed in this piece belong strictly to the writers and do not necessarily reflect IFMSA’s view on the topic, nor The European Sting’s one.

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