The 8 pieces of digital DNA we need to thrive in the AI age

DNA

(Holger Link, Unsplash)

This article is brought to you thanks to the collaboration of The European Sting with the World Economic Forum.

Author: Daniel Goleman, Co-Director, Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey


If you had a symptom of cancer, what kind of doctor would you look for?

Would you look for a doctor with a high IQ who can diagnose your condition with great accuracy but has an arrogant and demeaning attitude; or a high EQ (emotionally intelligent) doctor who treats you with care and compassion but makes you feel less confident about the diagnosis?

Many people would probably choose the doctor with a high IQ regardless of their bedside manner but what if all doctors had an artificial intelligence (AI) driven diagnostic machine that can give a highly accurate diagnosis of patients? Many people would then likely choose doctors with a high EQ, doctors who would be empathetic to your situation, compassionately communicate with you and your family and treat you with warmth and care.

 

Yet, you would still want a wise doctor that does not blindly follow an AI-based diagnosis. You would hope that the doctor balances AI’s diagnostic capabilities with good critical reasoning and deep understanding of the strengths and limitations of AI. The doctor should be able to contextualize your circumstances and situation beyond what AI captures in its algorithms, such as your family situation and religious beliefs, demonstrating empathy in not only diagnosis and treatment, but also in how these services are delivered to you.

As such, individuals need to embrace a new form of human intelligence beyond IQ and EQ to be successful in the AI age – digital intelligence (DQ) – that enables individuals to effectively utilize technology for the benefits of themselves, others and society as a whole. If a person with a high IQ is described as smart and a person with a high EQ as empathetic, then a person with a high DQ might be described as wise.

Intelligence has been humanity’s existential reason for being on Earth, as, so far, we have been the only intelligent masters on the planet. With the fast evolution of AI, which will soon have more superior “intelligence” than humans, we must ask ourselves this fundamental question from a new perspective: what measures will we take to keep humans as masters in the AI age?

With the tangible threat of AI-based weapons, the immediate response has been embedding AI ethics – ethical principles that ensure zero harm to humans – in all AI machines. Proponents of human rights argue about the need for an ethical framework to ensure that AI does not cause harm to people and society, but this isn’t enough. AI is everywhere, from the smartphones in our pockets to virtual assistance media devices in our living rooms and in our work email. Our data is being captured and fed back to AI machinery every second, everywhere. The most pressing matter is, therefore, that every individual becomes an ethical digital citizen. In fact, ethical and moral principles are at the very core of what makes a human, human.

Thus, digital DNA – the core building blocks of digital intelligence – is centred around the golden rule of “treat others as you want to be treated”. It has eight ethical components covering all dimensions of our digital life and centred on respect for self, time and environment, life, property, families and others, reputation and relationships, knowledge and human dignity.

What is the World Economic Forum doing about the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

The World Economic Forum was the first to draw the world’s attention to the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the current period of unprecedented change driven by rapid technological advances. Policies, norms and regulations have not been able to keep up with the pace of innovation, creating a growing need to fill this gap.

The Forum established the Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution Network in 2017 to ensure that new and emerging technologies will help—not harm—humanity in the future. Headquartered in San Francisco, the network launched centres in China, India and Japan in 2018 and is rapidly establishing locally-run Affiliate Centres in many countries around the world.

The global network is working closely with partners from government, business, academia and civil society to co-design and pilot agile frameworks for governing new and emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence (AI), autonomous vehicles, blockchain, data policy, digital trade, drones, internet of things (IoT), precision medicine and environmental innovations.

Learn more about the groundbreaking work that the Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution Network is doing to prepare us for the future.

Want to help us shape the Fourth Industrial Revolution? Contact us to find out how you can become a member or partner.

Ironically, this more than 2,000-year-old wisdom applies to the AI age, not in religious and moral contexts so much as in the practical competencies needed for daily life and work. It translates into learnable and practical competencies of DQ, from online safety and AI literacy to the job readiness that individuals need to be ready for life and work in the AI age.

Let’s dissect the human decision-making process based on the following five steps:

1) gathering the data we have (information gathering and synthesis);

2) developing information that we do not have (prediction);

3) judging based on prediction (judgement);

4) making decisions based on judgement calls (decision);

and 5) acting based on the chosen decision (action).

In the AI age, machines effectively cover the first two steps: information gathering and synthesis, and prediction. A human’s digital intelligence should cover the remaining three steps, relating to the decision-making process that is rooted in digital DNA. We make decisions by evaluating the trade-off between current circumstances and potential consequences on top of prediction results and ethical principles.

Going back to the doctor’s example, here are eight DQ competencies rooted in digital DNA that are required for cultivating the best doctors in the AI age:

  • Digital identity (respect for oneself): Have self-efficacy as a digital doctor who can utilize AI in the best interest of patients;
  • Digital literacy (respect for knowledge): Understand AI technology and know how to best utilize its knowledge-generating and predictive functions as part of decision-making processes;
  • Digital security (respect for property): Know how to handle cyber-security issues related to digital medical systems and patient data;
  • Digital use (respect for time and environment): Use AI as a complementary tool in a balanced way by understanding the strengths and limitations of AI;
  • Digital safety (respect for life): Know the potential risks associated with technology and how to mitigate them;
  • Digital emotional intelligence (respect for families and others): Choose a treatment method that takes into account a patient’s situation, financial status, emotions and condition, with empathy;
  • Digital communication (respect for reputation and relationships): Be aware that anything communicated about a patient online or offline can become part of a digital footprint and feedback “data” that can damage the privacy and reputation of a doctor and patients;
  • Digital right (respect for human dignity): Understand a patient’s rights to personal data and privacy.

Ethical principles are no longer just a moral compass for individuals; when it comes to our digital DNA, they will become our way of doing business and living. This DNA will empower humans to regain the driver’s seat in the age of AI and be the master of technology, rather than its slave.

Advertising

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

G7: A serious setback hardly avoided in iconic Biarritz

3 ways to fix the way we fund humanitarian relief

Is deflation a real danger for Eurozone?

EU citizens disenchanted with Economic and Monetary Union over rising poverty and high unemployment

Facts and prejudices about work

‘Much more’ can be done to raise awareness about the plight of persons with albinism: UN chief

Why we need different generations in the workplace

Preferential tariffs to help Western Sahara to develop

Coronavirus containment is the key, as infections tick up: Tedros

We don’t need to ban plastic. We just need to start using it properly

Banks, insurance giants are free again to abuse the real economy

Zimbabwe facing man-made starvation, says UN expert

Worldwide terror attacks have fallen for the third year in a row

The European Commission and EU consumer authorities publish final assessment of dialogue with Volkswagen

Britain, EU take edgy steps to unlock Brexit talks as the war of words rages

5 neuroscience hacks that will make you happier

From Policy to Reality: Discrepancies in Universal Health Care Systems across the EU

Parallel downfalls of Merkel and Deutsche Bank threaten Germany and Europe

It’s time to move: 5 ways we can upgrade our SDG navigation systems

Track the spread of coronavirus around the world

Amid ‘volatile’ environment, UN mission chief urges Iraqi leaders to ‘listen to the voice of the people’

European Innovation Scoreboard 2018: Europe must deepen its innovation edge

China Unlimited: the dragon’s long and winding road

Senior UN official strongly condemns Southern California synagogue attack

Will the Greek economy ever come back to growth?

The 5 things you need to make your teams more effective, according to Google

European Commission adopts new list of third countries with weak anti-money laundering and terrorist financing regimes

End ‘shame, isolation and segregation’ of fistula sufferers, urges UN reproductive health chief

Bram in Colombia

How do we design an inclusive energy transition?

EU budget: Stepping up the EU’s role as a security and defence provider

Encryption is under attack. Here’s why that matters

UN Member States overwhelmingly support end of US embargo against Cuba

China answers clearly to the European Commission’s investment negotiations with Taiwan

The Dead Sea is drying up, and these two countries have a plan to save it

Heart attacks and strokes are more common on high pollution days, data shows

Dignified and non-discriminatory heath care: does anyone even know what it means?

UN launches ‘South-South Galaxy’ knowledge-sharing platform in Buenos Aires

The link between migration and technology is not what you think

A ‘strong and united Europe’ has never been more needed, declares UN chief Guterres

COP24 negotiations: Why reaching agreement on climate action is so complex

EU economy: Between recession and indiscernible growth

Situation in central Mali ‘deteriorating’ as violence, impunity rise, UN rights expert warns

IMF asks Europe to decide on bank resolutions and the Greek Gordian knot

Hunger in Yemen: WFP considers aid suspension in face of repeated interference by some Houthi leaders

Chart of the day: This is how many animals we eat each year

How much is nature worth? $125 trillion, according to this report

Parliament closes legal loophole to stop excessive Ukrainian chicken imports

World’s Press Calls on the United Kingdom to Address Press Freedom Concerns

Big impact vs big exit: the social side of the start-up game presented at the WSA Global Congress in Vienna

MEPs call for decisive action to fight inequalities in the EU

4 bold new ways New York is going clean and green

Smart cities must pay more attention to the people who live in them

The US reject EU proposal for prudential financial controls

Can collective action cure what’s ailing our food systems?

This Scottish forest is both a home for wildlife and a boost for the local economy

Why the fight against nature loss should be a business priority

Why sustainable products are a win-win for all of us

Road to Brexit: the UK seeks early agreement on Data Privacy with the EU

Yesterday’s “jokes” and sarcasm by Digital Single Market’s Vice President Ansip on EU member states’ right to protect their telco markets

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s