Countries must make teaching profession more financially and intellectually attractive

MAP

Credit: OECD

This article is brought to you in association with the European Commission.


Countries need to make the teaching profession more financially and intellectually attractive to meet a growing demand across the world for high-quality teachers, according to a new OECD report.

Based on the OECD’s Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS), the report, Teachers and School Leaders as Lifelong Learners, says that attracting the best and brightest to the profession will be essential to ensure that young people are given the skills they will need to thrive in tomorrow’s world of work.

About 260,000 teachers and school leaders at 15,000 primary, lower and upper-secondary schools from 48 countries and economies took part in this third edition of the survey. Through the voices of teachers and school leaders, it aims to help strengthen the knowledge and skills of the teaching workforce to support its professionalism.

The findings show that much still needs to be done to give teachers better opportunities to prepare for tomorrow’s world. Little more than half of teachers across participating OECD countries received training in the use of technology for teaching, and less than half felt well prepared when they joined the profession. Yet two thirds of teachers report that the most useful professional development they took part in focused on innovation in their teaching.

“The acceleration of technological, economic and social changes makes it imperative that our education systems adapt almost in real time,” said Ludger Schuknecht, OECD Deputy Secretary-General, launching the report in Paris. “Policy makers should work closely with teachers and school leaders and leverage their expertise to help students succeed in the future world of work.”

“The quality of an education system can never exceed the quality of its teachers,” said Andreas Schleicher, OECD Director for Education and Skills. “Governments should empower their teachers and school leaders with the trust and autonomy they need to innovate and instil a collaborative culture in every school. They also need to better recognise the importance and value of involving teachers in designing better practices and policies to create classrooms fit for the future.”

Schools appear to be recognising the value of innovative teaching in responding to the challenges of the 21st century, according to the survey. The vast majority of teachers and school leaders say their schools are open to innovative practices and have the capacity to adopt them. On average across OECD countries in TALIS, 78% of teachers also report that they and their colleagues help each other implement new ideas. However, teachers in Europe are less likely to report such openness to innovation.

The report finds that recent changes in migration flows have affected the makeup of classrooms. Almost one-third of teachers in OECD countries report that they work in schools where at least 1% of the student population are refugees, and 17% of teachers work in schools where at least 10% of the students have a migrant background.

95% of school leaders report that their teachers believe that children and young people should learn that people of different cultures have a lot in common. 80% of teachers report working in schools that have integrated global issues throughout the curriculum, as well as teaching their students how to deal with ethnic and cultural discrimination.

Other key findings include:

Teaching as a career

Teaching was the first-choice career for two out of three teachers in participating OECD countries, but only for 59% of male teachers, compared to 70% of female teachers.

90% of teachers cite the opportunity to contribute to children’s development and society as a major motivation to become a teacher, and only 61% say that the steady career path offered by teaching was an important part of their decision making.

Teacher profiles

Teachers are, on average, 44 years old, ranging from 36 in Turkey to 50 in Georgia. Most teachers are women (68%), except in Japan (42%), while only 47% of principals are women.

ICT use

Only just over half of teachers (56%) across the OECD received training in the use of ICT for teaching as part of their formal education or training. ICT training is lowest in Sweden (37%) and Spain (38%) and most common in Chile (77%) and Mexico (77%).

About 18% of teachers across the OECD still express a high need for professional development in ICT skills for teaching.

One in four school leaders report a shortage and inadequacy of digital technology as a hindrance to providing quality instruction.

In the classroom

In OECD countries and economies participating in TALIS, only 78% of a typical lesson is dedicated to teaching, with the rest spent on keeping order (13%) and administrative tasks (8%).

Classroom time spent on actual teaching and learning is much lower in schools with high concentrations of students from socio-economically disadvantaged homes. Differences are particularly marked in Alberta (Canada), Australia, Austria, England, the Flemish Community of Belgium, France, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and the United States.

Relations between students and teachers have improved in most countries since 2008, with 95% of teachers agreeing students and teachers usually get on well with each other. However, 14% of principals report regular acts of intimidation or bullying among their students.

Professional development

More than 90% of teachers and principals attended at least one professional development activity in the year prior to the survey. But only 44% of teachers take part in training based on peer learning and networking, despite collaborative learning being identified by teachers as having the most impact on their work.

Around half of teachers and principals report that their participation in the professional development available to them is restricted by scheduling conflicts and lack of incentives.

Background

Participating countries and economies: Alberta (Canada), Australia, Austria, Belgium and the Flemish Community of Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, CABA (Argentina), Chile, Colombia, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, England (UK), Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Shanghai (China), Singapore, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, the United States and Viet Nam.

In each country, around 200 schools were randomly selected, and in each school one questionnaire was filled in by the school leader and another by 20 randomly selected teachers.

 

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Is Universal Health Coverage really available for all in the European Union?

Did young people just kill television?

CLIMATE CHANGE FOCUS: Cutting emissions, one bog at a time

COVID-19: research package welcomed, EU needs to be better equipped in future

South Sudan: UN condemns ‘brutal’ sexual assaults on roads to Bentiu

Brexit preparedness: EU completes preparations for possible “no-deal” scenario on 12 April

Dramatic drop in South Sudan political violence since peace agreement signing

Rohingya emergency one year on: UN says thousands of lives saved, but challenges remain

Conflict prevention, mediation: among ‘most important tools’ to reduce human suffering, Guterres tells Security Council

Mergers: Commission opens in-depth investigation into joint ventures proposed by Boeing and Embraer

Why people with disabilities are your company’s untapped resource

Why the Fourth Industrial Revolution needs more arts graduates

‘Every ventilator becomes like gold’ – a doctor’s stark warning from Italy’s Coronavirus outbreak

Sexual exploitation and abuse: latest UN quarterly update

Mobile technology saving lives: Changing healthcare systems with simple technological solutions

AI has huge potential – but it won’t solve all our problems

Parliament criticises Council’s rejection of money laundering blacklist

Here’s why the world’s recovery from COVID-19 could be doughnut shaped

Statement by President von der Leyen on CureVac

Eurozone: In vicious cycle of disinflation and unemployment?

Brexit: European Commission recommends the European Council (Article 50) to endorse the agreement reached on the revised Protocol on Ireland / Northern Ireland and revised Political Declaration

This Japanese experiment shows how easily coronavirus can spread – and what you can do about it

This is the first ever photo of a black hole

3 reasons why responsibly-deployed technology is key to the COVID recovery

How Google is fighting fire with real-time mapping data

What the next 20 years will mean for jobs – and how to prepare

VAT: EU Member States still losing almost €150 billion in revenues according to new figures

Privatization as a symptom of health inequity

UN chief appeals to G7 leaders for ‘strong commitment’ and political will to tackle climate emergency

Africa’s inspiring innovators show what the future could hold

New UN bullying report calls for ‘safe, inclusive’ schools for all children

FROM THE FIELD: Saving the tree kangaroos of Papua New Guinea

Member States agree to Commission proposal to support Irish beef producers impacted by market uncertainty

Capital Markets Union: Making it easier for insurers to invest in the real economy

Colombia is a Latin American success story, but must pursue new reforms to achieve stronger and more inclusive growth

VP McGuinness on women’s rights: “Not an option, but a duty”

The best and worst parenting advice I’ve heard, by a leading psychologist

EU and Airbus Member States take action to ensure full compliance in the WTO aircraft dispute

“BEUC cautions against TTIP that would seek to align EU and US chemicals management frameworks”

Why ‘video call fatigue’ might be making you tired during lockdown – and how to beat it

How fintech is making investment accessible

The most unlikely innovators are changing ICT for development – it’s time we took notice

Built by a woman: supporting the dreams of mum entrepreneurs

Why do US presidential elections last so long? And 4 other things you need to know

Is corporation tax good or bad for growth?

Some 300,000 Venezuelan children in Colombia need humanitarian assistance; UNICEF looks to boost response funding

An open letter to Europe’s leaders

The relation of deforestation and respiratory diseases

Link between conflict and hunger worldwide, ‘all too persistent and deadly’, says new UN report

This Central Asian lake is a stark reminder of the impact we have on the planet

EU prepares itself to fight back against hostile propaganda

We should treat data as a natural resource. Here’s why

EU to spend €6 billion on youth employment and training futile schemes

Facebook: MEPs demand a full audit by EU bodies to assess data protection

Google succumbs unconditionally to EU’s “right to be forgotten” ruling

Boat made of recycled plastic and flip-flops inspires fight for cleaner seas along African coast

The succesful cooperation

Making Europe’s businesses future-ready: A new Industrial Strategy for a globally competitive, green and digital Europe

China is the first non-EU country to invest in Europe’s €315 billion Plan

More Stings?

Advertising

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s