In Marrakech, UN chief urges world leaders to ‘breathe life’ into historic global migration pact

UN Photo/Mark Garten The Moroccan and United Nations flags are raised to mark the opening of the Global Compact for Migration conference in Marrakesh, Morocco.

This article is brought to you in association with the United Nations.

Leading Government representatives from more than 150 States have arrived in Marrakech, Morocco, with a view to adopting a ground-breaking UN-led global migration compact which is designed to make the growing phenomenon safer and more dignified for millions on the move.

On the eve of the opening of the intergovernmental conference centred around the Global Compact for Migration, United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres thanked everyone at the conference for their commitment “to agreeing a common approach to international migration in all its dimensions.”

Your participation in this conference is a clear demonstration of the importance our global community places on the pursuit of the better managment of international migration, through a cooperative approach – UN chief Guterres

Thanking in particular the Moroccan Government and  people for their welcome and the “fantastic miracle” of the conference centre in Marrakech,  he said that “many months of inclusive dialogue have produced an impressive document on one of the most pressing global challenges of our times.”

“Your participation in this conference is a clear demonstration of the importance our global community places on the pursuit of the better managment of international migration, through a cooperative approach that is grounded in the principles of state sovereignty, responsibility-sharing, non-discrimination and human rights.”

Mr. Guterres urged world leaders to “breathe life” into what has been agreed on, and “demonstrate the Compact’s utility: to Governments as they establish and implement their own migration policies,” as well as “to communities of origin, transit and destination; and to migrants themselves.”

The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) is the first-ever inter-governmentally negotiated agreement to cover all dimensions of international migration in a holistic and comprehensive manner.

It was born out of the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, adopted unanimously by the UN General Assembly in September 2016, and is the culmination of 18 months of discussions and consultations among Member States, and other actors, including national and local officials, civil society, private and public sectors and migrants.

The UN Special Representative for International Migration, Louise Arbour, addresses delegates at the flag-raising ceremony of the Global Compact for Migration conference in Marrakesh, Morocco.

The United Nations Special Representative for International Migration Ms. Louise Arbour emphasized that “the adoption of the Migration Compact is a re-affirmation of the values and principles embodied in the UN Charter and in international law.”

The UN asserts that the GCM is not a legally binding document and that its text is an agreed outcome from several years of intergovernmental negotiations and it is for each State to determine its own next steps.

Launch of new UN Migration Network to support States

During the reception ceremony, the Secretary-General officially launched the United Nations Network on Migration, with the aim of mobilizing the full resources of the world organization and expertise, in support of Member States. He announced that the “the International Organization for Migration (IOM) will play a central role” in the network.

Expressing his confidence in the new network, Mr. Guterres highlighted some of its core features saying that “it will focus on collaboration.” In addition to that, the network will have an inclusive structure, while embodying UN values, like diversity and an openness to working with all partners, at all levels, he explained.

Marrakech leaves its mark on Global Compact

In the morning, the head of the conference Ms. Arbour, accompanied by the Moroccan Permanent Representative to the UN, Omar Hilale, at a flag-raising ceremony. A symbolic act of solidarity and intent, for the gathering in Marrakech, which has taken months of negotiation and effort, and seen several countries in recent weeks waver in their support for the adoption of the Compact.

Calling it a historic moment for both his country and the United Nations, Mr. Hilale said it was “a historic moment for two reasons”, both as the first ever international conference on the issue, and “the second reason is that the Marrakech document will be the first document in UN history that will address the rights of migrants and defend it. Marrakech will lend its name to this document.”

Ms. Arbour praised the Kingdom of Morocco for creating an inspiring environment to launch “one of the defining projects of our generation,” as she described it, adding that “the Marrakech Compact will remain the reference for all future initiatives dealing with cross-border human mobility.”

With hours to go before Governments are expected to adopt the Compact, Ms. Arbour stressed that what came next was the crucial phase.

It is the implementation of the Compact “that will forever change the way the International Community manages human mobility,” she said.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

5 things you might not know about Leonardo da Vinci

Devastating storms like Hurricane Florence ‘unusual this far north’: UN weather agency

Global aid appeal targets more than 93 million most in need next year

Peace icon Mahatma Gandhi’s message of ‘mutual understanding, equality’ reverberates on Day of Non-Violence

5 ways for scientists and clinicians to double up on healthcare

5 things fighting malaria can teach us about Universal Health Coverage

MWC 2016: IoT experts fret over fragmentation

The ITU Telecom World on 14-17 November in Bangkok, Thailand

While EU Open Days 2013 discuss the 2020 strategy, Microsoft shares a glimpse of EU 2060

7 ways for businesses to capture the youth dividend

Four things Turkey did for business in the G20

5 libraries doing innovative things to help their communities

Education critical to ensure future of forests, and reverse their destruction

Retirees will outlive their savings by a decade

Learn from the margin, not the center: digital innovation with social impact as transformative force bridging digital divide

South Sudan famine threat: UN food security agency in ‘race against time’

Better training ‘a necessary and strategic investment’ in peacekeeping that saves lives: Guterres

Globalization 4.0 must build a better world for working people

Joris in Indonesia

5G in Russia: a local and global view on the way forward, in association with The European Sting

US-EU trade negotiations: pointless tariffs against real economic growth

Mali peace process in a ‘critical phase’, says head of UN Mission

Brazilian health: right or privilege?

Spending another 3 billion euros on Turkey feels better than admitting EU’s failure

This Chinese tech giant’s latest gadget is… a bus

How Costa Rica’s environment minister talks to his daughter about climate change

Take action on air pollution to save lives, and the planet, urges UN chief

The Europe we want: Just, Sustainable, Democratic and Inclusive

Confidence-building measures continue in new Yemen prisoner-swap talks

Yemen hospital airstrike under investigation amid resurgence of deadly cholera

World Food Programme accesses Yemeni frontline district for first time since conflict began

UN health emergency committee to re-convene on global threat posed by China coronavirus

Cyprus banks under scrutiny

Where are the world’s nuclear weapons?

State aid: Commission finds Luxembourg gave illegal tax benefits to Engie; has to recover around €120 million

Why are so few women buying into Bitcoin?

3 ways blockchain can revolutionize global supply chains

EP Group leaders on Brexit: “the agreement is not open to renegotiation”

Pushing for tax fairness in a digital world

UN-based World Summit Award (WSA) presents its master list on digital innovation with impact on society from 24 countries

How will the NATO-EU competition evolve in the post Brexit era?

SMEs are the most valuable partners. Here’s why

Japan should reform retirement policies to meet challenge of ageing workforce

Macron in St. Petersburg didn’t oppose Trump on Iran, in Putin’s presence

Italy should boost investment in training for the future of work

UN chief calls for ‘green and clean’ development in message for Africa Industrialization Day

Trade, taxes and other takeaways from Li Keqiang’s speech to the World Economic Forum

Tuesday’s Daily Brief: #GlobalGoals progress, essential meds, updates from Cox’s Bazar, Sudan and DR Congo

The 4 biggest challenges to our higher education model – and what to do about them

EU Parliament: Deposit guarantee and trading platform transparency sought

The power of partnership: joining forces to fight financial crime

Spanish vote – bad luck for Greece: Does Iphigenia need to be sacrificed for favourable winds to blow in Eurozone?

Trump aims trade offensive solely to China, renews truce with EU

Tsipras imposes more austerity on insolvent Greece; plans to win new early election soon

‘Never give up’: UN chief urges all who serve, marking UN Day

UN should be ‘exemplary’ in defending judicial independence, top Judge tells Security Council

Preventing and resolving conflicts must form ‘backbone’ of collective efforts – UN chief

Parlamentarians to “break up” with reality in the Google antitrust case

Why collective action is the key to saving our forests

Hostages to a rampant banking system

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s