US-North Korea summit in Singapore ‘a promising development’ says Guterres

UN Photo/Manuel Elias
Secretary-General António Guterres delivers remarks on the US-DPRK Summit at UN Headquarters in New York. 11 June 2018.

This article is brought to you in association with the United Nations.

The summit that is due to begin shortly between the leaders of the United States and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is “a promising development for global peace and security,” United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres said on Monday.

US President Donald Trump and his North Korean counterpart Kim Jong-un are due to meet in Singapore on Tuesday morning: the first-ever face-to-face encounter between a sitting US President and a North Korean leader.

As the UN chief stated, the world is watching.

“The two leaders are seeking to break out of the dangerous cycle that created so much concern last year,” Mr. Guterres told journalists at UN Headquarters in New York, referring to escalating tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

“Peace and verifiable denuclearization must remain the clear and shared goal.  As I wrote to both leaders last month, the road ahead will require cooperation, compromise and a common cause.”

UN agencies on standby

Among them are the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which works for the safe, secure and peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology.

He recalled that the agency has a mandate “to apply safeguards on all nuclear material in peaceful use, including all material removed from military programmes.”

Furthermore, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) could also play a role in monitoring the DPRK’s moratorium on nuclear tests, he added.

“I believe that this summit is an extremely important event,” said the UN chief, taking questions from reporters. “I believe the two leaders need to be credited for the courage with which they decided to move forward with the summit and to engage in a constructive negotiation to reach an objective that is vital for us all: the peaceful and verifiable denuclearization of North Korea,” he added.

Diplomatic timeline

Last year, as North Korea carried out further nuclear weapons and ballistic missile tests, since conducting its first nuclear test in 2006, the UN Security Council adopted several resolutions condemning the launches and toughening sanctions against DPRK.

3 September, 2017: DPRK conducts its sixth nuclear test.

11 September 2017: The UN Security Council unanimously adopts a resolution imposing fresh sanctions on DPRK, targeting the country’s oil imports, and textile exports.

13 November, 2017: the 193-member UN General Assembly adopted a resolution urging Member States to observe the ‘Olympic Truce’ throughout the 2018 Winter Games in the Republic of Korea, and expressed its expectation that “Pyeongchang 2018 will be a meaningful opportunity to foster an atmosphere of peace, development, tolerance and understanding on the Korean Peninsula and in Northeast Asia”.

14 September, 2017:  Ballistic missile from DPRK flies over Japan – Security Council press statement condemns launches citing “outrageous actions” and demanding North Korea complies with UN resolutions to halt nuclear programme.

5-8 December, 2017:  the then head of the UN’s Department of Political Affairs travelled to North Korea for talks with senior officials.  Jeffrey Feltman said he had stressed the international community’s commitment to a peaceful political solution to the situation on the Korean Peninsula.

Speaking to reporters after returning to New York, he described the visit as “the most important mission I’ve ever undertaken,” adding that “we’ve left the door ajar, and I fervently hope that the door to a negotiated solution will now be opened wide.”

15 December, 2017: Council holds ministerial-level meeting on “Threats and Challenges posed the by the DPRK to International Peace and Security”.

9 January, 2018: North and South Korean officials meet and agree the north with send athletes and delgates to the upcoming Winter Olympics across the border in Pyeongchang.

9 February, 2018: South and North march together during the opening of the Olympics. Secretary-General Guterres, who attended the Games, said that though the Olympic tradition of peace and cooperation was a global one, it had special resonance on the Korean Peninsula.

27 April, 2018: DPRK leader Kim Jong-un holds historic summit meeting with President Moon of the Republic of Korea, on the border between the two countries, after the North says it has suspended nuclear and long-range missile tests, and plans to close its nuclear test sites.

May 10, 2018: President Trump first announces he will meet the North Korean leader on June 12.

UN plays major humanitarian role in North Korea

During his remarks to journalists on Monday, the Secretary-General also drew attention to the humanitarian situation in North Korea, where the UN estimates more than 10 million people, or 40 per cent of the population, require assistance.

Aid agencies are seeking $111 million to assist six million in need this year.

The funding will support operations in areas such as enhancing food security, reducing malnutrition, and increasing access to healthcare, water and sanitation services.

Communities will also receive help to become more resilent in the face of recurrent natural hazards such as droughts and floods.

Among the UN agencies active in the country are the World Food Programme (WFP): a presence for more than two decades.

The UN agency aims to assist 650,000 women and children there every month, who are being given dietary supplements in the form of fortified cereals and biscuits.

WFP Executive Director David Beasley was in North Korea last month to assess needs and evaluate operations on the ground.

Mr. Beasley visited several projects including a WFP-supported children’s nursery and a local factory where WFP produces the fortified biscuits for its programmes.

“There is a real need for continued humanitarian assistance, especially when it comes to meeting the nutritional needs of mothers and young children,” he said at the end of the four-day mission.

“I do believe that with hard work and support from around the world we’ll be able to make a difference.”

The latest report from the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) on needs inside North Korea, published in April, says that there are “many complex, intertwined reasons” for the country’s high rate of undernutrition.

It points out that only 17 per cent of land is good for cultivation in DPRK, and that households are having to increasingly rely on farmers’ markets beyond the public food distribution system, involving bartering and swaps.

Most food is still produced on around 3,900 cooperative farms, with 100 State-run farms focussing on specialized food production.

The report concludes that humanitarian agencies have been making progress in meeting the needs of the most vulnerable, partly as a result of “growing confidence building with the Government and engagement with them on humanitarian operations”.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Featured Stings

G7 summit: Trump Vs. G6 leaders on trade and climate change

Switzerland to favour EU citizens in immigration quotas as the risk of a new referendum looms

“BEUC cautions against TTIP that would seek to align EU and US chemicals management frameworks”

Is the ECB ready to flood Eurozone with freshly printed money?

EU Commission: a rise in wages and salaries may help create more jobs

Big impact vs big exit: the social side of the start-up game presented at the WSA Global Congress in Vienna

EU Parliament: ECB accountable for not supporting real economy

Will the three major parties retain control of the new EU Parliament?

Has the treacherous theory about the ‘French patient’ finally prevailed?

Historical success for the First ever European Presidential Debate

After the Italian ‘no’ and the Brexit, Germans must decide which Europe they want

The world has made spectacular progress in every measure of well-being. So why does almost no one know about it?

Chinese “BeiDou” GPS goes to market

The next EU President will first have to drink his tea at Downing Street

How biotechnology is evolving in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Intel @ European Business Summit 2014: Better decisions now, the new business dashboard 

Migration crisis update: lack of solidarity not only among EU leaders but also EU officials

From inconvenience to opportunity: the importance of international medical exchanges

Afghanistan: UN envoy urges further extension of ceasefire with Taliban, as Eid ul-Fitr gets underway

German political spillovers: ECB’s Draghi resists first attacks by AfD

A Valentine’s Special: heart has nothing to do with it, it’s all Brain

ECB settles the bank resolution issue, makes banking union tangible

EU-Russia relations: the beginning of a warmer winter?

European banking stress tests 2014: A more adverse approach for a shorter banking sector

Is history a new NATO weapons against Russia?

The IMF overstates the risks for Eurozone and downgrades the threats for the US economy

Here are 4 of the most politically charged World Cup games ever played

Military escalation will have ‘serious consequences’ for Yemeni civilians, warns UN Special Envoy

EU-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement sees the light as Moscow’s reaction once more looms

Glaringly false reassurances about the repercussions of the EU-US free trade agreement

A Sting Exclusive: “Regional Policy: a fully-fledged investment policy”, Commissioner Cretu reveals live from European Business Summit 2015

MWC 2016 LIVE: 5G to embrace unlicensed bands and Wi-Fi

Hollande protects the euro from the attacks of extremists

Is Britain to sail alone in the high seas of trade wars?

A new world that demands new doctors in the fourth industrial revolution

“China will strive to enhance the performance of economic growth”, President Xi highlights from the World Economic Forum 2017 in Davos

Greece lost a month that cannot be found neither in “mini Summits” nor in Berlin

Ethiopia will soon introduce visa-free travel for all Africans

The miserables and the untouchables of the economic crisis

How will Brexit affect higher education in the EU?

Paris agreed with Berlin over a loose and ineffective banking union

Banks, insurance giants are free again to abuse the real economy

World Health Organisation and medical students: is there any room for improvement?

China’s New Normal and Its Relevance to the EU

Education and Training: where do we stand in 2014?

The European Sting @ European Business Summit 2014 – the preview

Let’s Learn

Migration Crisis: how to open the borders and make way for the uprooted

Migration has set EU’s political clock ticking; the stagnating economy cannot help it and Turkey doesn’t cooperate

This crisis cannot be confronted with statistics

The DNA of the future retail CEO

“Fortress Europe”, “Pegida” and its laughing stocks

Warmongers ready to chew what is left of social protection spending

US-North Korea summit in Singapore ‘a promising development’ says Guterres

UN warns of ‘deteriorating climate’ for human rights defenders in Guatemala

The European Sting @ Mobile World Congress 2014, Creating What’s Next for the World. Can EU Policy follow?

EDRi @ European Business Summit 2014: Digital Citizenship in Brussels – the case of Net Neutrality

Are you breathing plastic air at home? Here’s how microplastics are polluting our lungs

Trump questions US – Europe kinship, approaches Russia

Here’s how China is going green

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s