What Merkel and Macron are to tell Trump in Davos?

Chancellor Angela Merkel met with her Austrian counterpart Sebastian Kurz for talks at the German Federal Chancellery, on 17 January. She is back in the international arena after months of problems at home and plans to travel to Davos this week. Photo: Bundesregierung/Kugler

Donald Trump, the American President, is to deliver the closing speech at this year’s World Economic Forum Annual Meeting of 23-26 January in Davos, which as usually is set in the unsullied Alpine landscape. Perhaps, he has something new to say about how America sees Europe. Most probably though, he is simply to repeat his aggressive rhetoric about the Old Continent’s or rather Germany’s faults, regarding bilateral trade and military spending. The French President Emmanuel Macron and the German Chancellor Angela Merkel are also to attend and speak at the 2018 Forum. In total, some thousands of political, government, business, financial and civil society leaders and super rich will be enjoying the legendary Swiss hospitality.

Obviously, both Merkel and Macron will grab the opportunity to engage Trump about his so far unreceptive attitude against Europe. What they are going to tell Trump will be surely related to the 2017 exchanges, between the two sides of the Atlantic Ocean. In order then to understand the meaning of the three speeches, one has to get acquainted with the important moments in the US-Europe relations during the past twelve months. Let’s dig into that.

Heavy traffic over the Atlantic

All along during last year the European leaders had difficulties grasping, what the Trump presidency means for the Old Continent. In his first participation to a NATO conference, the American president went as far as to tell some Europeans in general and Germany in particular, that they owe much money to the US and NATO. Why? For not meeting their obligation to spend 2% of their GDP on armaments, preferably ‘made in America’. He has also accused Germany of exploiting unwarranted advantages in their bilateral trade.

A striking and direct American uppercut hit against the German Chancellor Angela Merkel personally has also been recorded in 2017. Trump has repeatedly said she is destroying her country, by letting in hundreds of thousands of immigrants. In an indirect way, the US president was thus intervening in German political life, supporting the anti-immigration party AfD, a racist and extreme right group. In the September 2017 general election, Germany’s largest ruling party, Merkel’s conservative grouping of CDU, found out the hard way what it costs to maintain an open door policy for immigrants; AfD won one million voters from the conservatives.

Targeting Germany

Trump, even before winning the most important job of the planet, had targeted the US imports of German products. He actually spearheaded his electoral campaign with rhetoric against free world trade, and blamed the imports of BMWs, Mercedes and Audis as one of main causes for America’s imbalances. Still today, the United States is blaming the global free trade arrangement and questions the rules of the World Trade Organization for allegedly penalizing America. It’s not clear yet how seriously is the US planning to practically undercut free global trade, the platform which constitutes the foundation of German prosperity.

No wonder then why Angela Merkel told her European counterparts not to count on America any more, to fight together with the Old Continent, if threats appear. She clearly and loudly said “We Europeans should take our fate to our own hands”. It was as if the NATO bond between the two sides of the Atlantic Ocean was in serious doubt and the US no longer considered the security of Europe as vital as their own. Under Trump, the foundations and the values of the Western World are thus effectively shaken.

Shattering the ‘common values’

In this line of thinking, Trump’s America has also introduced the idea of founding political decision making on ‘alternative facts’. Trump’s White House initiated this unbelievable practice on the first day he stepped in there, by publicising exaggerated numbers, for the attendance of the swearing in ceremony, and then insisting on that. This preposterous way of thinking may not be related to Europe in a direct way, yet it’s a challenge against the sober and exact patent of German thinking.

Speaking about questioning the European standards for political and economic thinking and doing, Paris the ‘city of light’ seems not to have taken the same offence as Berlin. Actually, Emmanuel Macron the French President, invited Trump to together watch the super-spectacle of the ‘Quatorze-Juillet’ , the 14 July military parade in the Champs-Élysées. Trump, of an evidently clownish nature, greatly enjoyed this French treat. The US withdrawal from the United NationsParis Agreement’ for the environment didn’t stop Macron from offering Trump such an honor, despite the latter still insists NATO is an obsolete organization.

The French disconnection

There is no doubt that Trump’s European policy is targeting Germany, not France. This differentiation of the US mind-set towards Europe will be very probably evident in Trump’s Davos speech. It will also be present in what Merkel and Macron have to say to their audience of global leaders. It’s about time the European political horizon became clearer. Macron is currently rushing to precipitate it.

The weakening of Angela Merkel’s position in the internal political arena of her country, offers the French President the opportunity to try and restore France’s position as the ‘Political Academy’ of Europe. It’s not only that he has set the principles to reshape the future of Europe, in a way the Germans cannot easily follow; during the last two weeks, while visiting Beijing and London, Macron also appeared as the authentic representative of the European Union. He asked his Chinese host, Xi Jinping, to further ease the European investments in China and offered him as a gift a horse of the French National Guard. Then in London he promised Theresa May, the British PM, an EU-UK very ‘special trade deal’ after Brexit.

All in all, what Merkel and Macron have to tell Trump this week in Davos won’t be a well concerted narrative. The European divide will be also seem deepened by the anti-immigration rhetoric of the Visegrád (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia) four leaders, who are openly siding with Trump in his xenophobic scheme.

 

the sting Milestones

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Fleeing Venezuela: MEPs to probe humanitarian conditions in Colombia and Brazil

Endocrine disruptors: A strategy for the future that protects EU citizens and the environment

ECB intervenes to clean May’s and Schäuble’s mess

Businesses can lead a revolution in disability inclusion

Media and entertainment in flux: it’s time for the close-up

Questions directors need to ask in the age of stakeholder capitalism

‘Abhorrent’ ambulance attack in Libyan capital imperils life-saving work, warns UN

Competition: The European Commission launches a process to address the issue of collective bargaining for the self-employed

4 ways to become a ‘business baobab’ on the African economic landscape

How to Create a Clear Vision For the Future of Healthcare

China Unlimited Special Report: The trip to China

Women’s rights and how medical students can act as aides of progressive change

Syria’s Idlib ‘on the brink’ of a nightmare, humanitarian chiefs warn, launching global solidarity campaign

Social, cultural diversity ‘an enormous richness, not a threat’ Guterres declares calling on investment for a harmonious future

Commission launches initiative for more sustainable cocoa production

We need to rethink neuroscience. And you can help us

EU Parliament: Deposit guarantee and trading platform transparency sought

Palliative care and Universal Health Coverage: how to advocate for the inclusion of palliative care in UHC

Migrant caravan: UN agency helping ‘exhausted’ people home

Quantum technologies can transform innovation and mitigate climate change – here’s how

Two rhythms and a sharpened pencil: how art can help us heal and make sense of the world

‘Jerusalem is not for sale’ Palestinian President Abbas tells world leaders at UN Assembly

Gender equality in STEM is possible. These countries prove it

The vehicles of our future

4 solutions for reducing emissions from industrial clusters

Here are five tips to make your message clear in a crowded world

Business growth is key to post-pandemic recovery

To feed 10 billion people, we must preserve biodiversity. Here’s how

Palliative care effectiveness at Universal Health Care: an eminent need

From battlefields to boardrooms: 3 steps to building high-morale teams

Forget GDP – for the 21st century we need a modern growth measure

Digital Day 2021: EU countries commit to key digital initiatives for Europe’s Digital Decade

EU Charter of Fundamental Rights marks its 10th anniversary

ECB readies itself for extraordinary monetary measures defying Germany

The EU Commission fails to draw the right conclusions about corruption

Mergers: Commission announces evaluation results and follow-up measures on jurisdictional and procedural aspects of EU merger control

Human rights are everyone’s business, amid relentless crises around world: UN’s Bachelet

Commission presents far-reaching anti-tax evasion measures

Bold measures needed to protect cross-border and seasonal workers in EU, MEPs say

Why lockdowns can halt the spread of COVID-19

The megatrend that will shape our working future

EU approves disbursement of €500 million in Macro-Financial Assistance to Ukraine

Governments, businesses ‘walk the talk’ for investment in sustainable development: UN forum

The world is facing more disasters. This is how data can help us reduce that risk

Can the EU really make Google and Facebook pay publishers and media?

The future of international election observation missions

International Literacy Day: What you need to know about youth literacy

EU-U.S. trade talks – one year on, Commission presents progress report

Yanukovych attempts a violent and deadly cleansing of Kiev’s center

This country is restarting air travel. Here’s how

The public health system in Brazil as a promoter of sexual and reproductive health and rights: how does it help in the fight against HIV/AIDS?

Iran cannot be allowed to develop nuclear weapons: Israeli Foreign Minister

The end of Spitzenkandidat: EU leaders concluded unexpectedly on EU top jobs

How we planted more than 5,000 trees during the COVID-19 pandemic

MEPs list conditions for new EU-Azerbaijan deal

This plastic-free bag dissolves in water

Plastic Oceans: MEPs back EU ban on throwaway plastics by 2021

Syria’s groundbreaking constitutional talks: ‘a clear success of mediation’ says Guterres in Turkey

Human rights ‘core to sustainable development’: deputy UN chief

Focus on EU’s external action and building our stronger inner core: von der Leyen at the Special European Council

More Stings?

Advertising

Comments

  1. “We will pay you for you to incur losses. And also that you are afraid of being under constant sight from Russia because of our nuclear weapons “- that’s what Trump will say.

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s