How will Brexit affect higher education in the EU?

Ms Theresa MAY, UK Prime Minister.
Location: Bruxelles – BELGIUM
Date: 09/03/2017
Copyright: European Union

This article was exclusively written for the Sting by Mr Minhajul Abedin. The opinions expressed in this piece belong strictly to the writer and do not necessarily reflect The European Sting’s view on the topic.

The representative organisation for the United Kingdom’s universities has calculated that between 2012 and 2013, EU citizens comprised about 5.5 percent of the total UK student population, contributing £3.7 billion in the form of fees, accommodation and taxes to the British economy and providing 34,000 jobs – the number has steadily increased ever since. In the longer term, it seems likely that EU students will have to pay higher fee rates that currently apply to those from outside of the EU.

However, those looking on the brighter side have pointed out that the pound’s fall in value, if sustained, will continue to make studying in the UK more affordable for all international students. Additionally, in October 2016, Home Secretary Amber Rudd announced several consultations on student visas, in the context of a series of strategies to reduce overall immigration numbers. She outlined a possible two-tier system, in which “tougher rules” would apply to students enrolling in “lower quality courses”.

There could also be more widespread changes to the current student visa system, affecting all international students. As hinted by the Prime Minister in her address to dignitaries and journalists at the Lancaster House, a ‘hard’ Brexit is highly anticipated at least in some facets of the potential deals. This may cut off the free movement of people completely. For starters, students from the EU may be subjected to work restrictions, and they may also have to apply for a Tier 4 Student Visas and the system of work permits might fly into action. Students from the European Union may no longer enjoy fee reductions, consequently pulling down the influx of EU students.

More than 100 universities and other organisations have so far joined the #WeAreInternational campaign, which aims to ensure Brexit does not result in fewer international students and academics coming to the UK. In addition, Britain’s access to the European Union’s flagship student mobility programme, Erasmus+, will be dramatically affected once Brexit happens, presumably in Spring 2019.

Erasmus+ has benefited 85,000 UK students on study and work placements, and staff too can take up exchange opportunities. The government says participation after Brexit ‘depends on negotiations’. Meanwhile, the UK already seems less attractive post-referendum. The elite Russell Group universities are concerned about falling applications from EU students. Cambridge reports a 17% drop in EU applications for 2017 and is planning for two thirds fall thereafter.

Many institutions fear a loss of access to talent in recruitment. There are reports of British universities struggling to attract European Economic Area (EU plus Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein) applicants to teaching and research posts, and a University College Union survey says 42% of staff is considering leaving the UK, many fearing cuts in research funding. Almost half said they had colleagues who had already lost out on funding bids. Other EU member states may attract academics outside of the UK, especially concerning EU nationals which currently account to 13.6 percent of senior lecturers in Great Britain.

Brexit sends a negative message not just to 27 EU partners, but to the entire world. Lord Bilimoria, the founder of Cobra beer, has attacked the government’s failure to remove students from net migration figures. He urged the Vice Chancellors’ group Universities UK (UUK) to insist on free movement for students and working visas for non-EEA graduates, as happens in most of Europe, and in Canada, Australia and the USA. Worryingly, the Higher Education Policy Institute reports Home Office plans to place fresh restrictions on overseas students, which it claims could cost the UK £2bn a year.

However, we are not taking into consideration the positive effects of Brexit concerning other aspects such as Security, Law and Jurisdictions. After London and Manchester suffered what were the worst terrorist attacks on British soil since 2005, populist leaders across the Union are pointing at unrestricted immigration as a contributing factor to terrorism, favouring in fact high restriction on the movement of people that will as well influence international students.

About the author

Md. Minhajul Abedin is currently an International and Business Development Consultant at Westminster Business Consultants (WBC) based in London. He is a recipient of the Westminster International Scholarship and his experience includes some working at the United States Department of State, AFS-USA and iEARN-BD. 

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Featured Stings

Trump systematically upsets global order and trade: Where does this end?

Europe moulds global defense and security chart given US new inward vision

JADE Spring Meeting 2017– day 1: Excellence awards, panel discussion, keynote speeches

Trade deals’ pure realism: it may take 10 years for a post-Brexit agreement

Israel @ MWC14: Israel The Start App Nation

Germany rules the banking industry of Eurozone

Social Committee teaches Van Rompuy a lesson

Five cities short-listed to become the European Youth Capital 2017

A Sting Exclusive: “Doing ourselves a favour”, Vice President Dombrovskis underscores that this time growth has to come from within the EU

IMF: Sorry Greece it was a mistake of 11% of your GDP

Europe provides financial support to African countries while Turkey denies to change terrorism laws jeopardising the EU deal

MWC 2016 LIVE: Ingenu steps up efforts to build LPWA networks across the globe

EU Summit’s major takeaway: a handkerchief cannot save Greece from austerity

Jade Spring Meeting 2017 – day 2: Coporate workshops, general assembly and magna moment

Young people are Europe’s biggest value and hope

Industrial price dive may lead to point of no return

The European Parliament x-rays the troika’s doings

How can entrepreneurship tackle the migration crisis in the EU?

Preparing for developing countries the ‘Greek cure’

The 28 EU leaders don’t touch the thorny issues

Dreaming of China

Can the US deal a blow to EU and Russia together over Ukraine?

The EU Commission predicts a decimated growth in the next years

EU: Divided they stand on immigration and Trump hurricanes

Internet of Things: a Force for Good or Evil?

A Sting Exclusive: “Leading by example! EU must push for UN deal to avoid dangerous climate change”, European Parliament Vice-President Ulrike Lunacek cries out from Brussels

G20 LIVE: G20 Leaders’ Communiqué Antalya Summit, 15-16 November 2015

EU Youth Conference in Riga concludes with recommendations for ministers

Why the ECB suddenly decided to flood banks with money?

Did Draghi ask the Germans to accept a drastic change of austerity policies?

IMF’s Lagarde to Peoples of the world: You have to work more for the banks!

South Eurozone countries threatened by rising borrowing cost and expensive euro

More taxpayers’ money for the banks

Eurozone: Uncertain future with unemployment ravaging the South

London to say hello or goodbye to Brussels this week

Facts and prejudices about work

18th EU Eco-Innovation Forum in Barcelona shows the way for Europe’s new Environmental policy

Towards a seamless internal EU market for industrial goods

Europe’s richest regions actively seek investment from China’s biggest banks

Theresa May in search of a magic plan to invoke Article 50 and start Brexit negotiations now

WEF Davos 2016 LIVE: “European unity and cooperation is being called on question”, Vice President Joe Biden criticizes from Davos

Brussels enraged with Swiss referendum result to keep out EU citizens

“Access denied”: the Greek health system under pressure

Can the world take the risk of a new financial armageddon so that IMF doesn’t lose face towards Tsipras?

Refugee crisis update: Commission still in panic while Turkey is to be added in the equation

What lessons to draw from the destruction of Syria

Teamgum @ TheNextWeb 2014

Draghi cuts the Gordian knot of the Banking Union

A day that Berlin and Brussels would remember for a long time

MasterCard @ MWC14: Innovation in times of regulatory uncertainty

Infinite Oath

In China things are moving in the right direction

Ukraine turns again to the EU for more money

COP21 Breaking News_09 December: List of Recent Climate Funding Announcements

Dealing with stress among healthcare professionals: are we missing the elephant in the room?

Elections in Europe: No risks for the EU, leaders readying to face Trump-Brexit

Investing in working conditions and quality jobs

EU-China relations under investigation?

A Sting Exclusive: “There can be no global deal on emissions without China and the USA”, Conservative MEP Ian Duncan stresses from Brussels

Sustainable Development Goals: making the world a better place

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s