How bad could British healthcare get for its citizens abroad post-Brexit?

Teresa May_2017_

EU Council, 2017

This article was exclusively written for the Sting by one of our passionate writers, Mrs Rachael Everly. The opinions expressed within reflect only the writer’s views and not The European Sting’s position on the issue.

Brexit was a surprising yet saddening event for most people in the country. However, it is a reality that many British have come face to face along with the rest of the world. There is no turning back from that and the people of this great country are going to suffer its consequences. A speculation was made into how much it can affect the economy of the country, and post-Brexit results actually showed that a falling economy was indeed a reality. The value of the British pound dropped and England faces a loss of a lot of benefits that it enjoyed staying in the European Union.

There is one aspect that people rarely talk about of this awful situation, which is the system of British healthcare. As it was advertised pre-Brexit that a total of 350Million pounds is given to EU to aid Brussels, and instead, it could have been helped to build a hospital in their own country if it had not been in the EU. This proposition hasn’t come true yet and there are no hospitals being built from the money saved from that area.  On the contrary, there are multiple lives that are going to be affected adversely in terms of healthcare especially the citizens who are living in other European countries.

Spain is home to over 100,000 British citizens who are on their pensions; but due to England’s exit from the EU, those citizens cannot enjoy the same advantages that they had before. These people aren’t the ones who were rich and could afford to move abroad, they made this choice of shifting since they could afford to live in Spain as opposed to the expenses in the UK. Now, the patients who lack the financial resources for private treatment would be left without any healthcare system and their treatments would come to a complete halt. They would only be able to continue their treatment if they come back to Britain and take up permanent residence in their own country.

Prior to this, a system was set up which benefitted those people abroad known as the NHS treatment. It facilitated people who held a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) when visiting the UK temporarily. That scheme will be permanently stopped when the UK leaves the European Union entirely. The British living abroad won’t be assisted by the country they inhabit because they don’t have permanent residence there and neither have they provided any kind of service to that society.

Furthermore, this is not only about the senior population of the UK living in other European countries, but also the younger generations. The British, who have a lifestyle in their neighboring countries, would also run the risk of not being able to afford medical bills. People with families and kids who have medical conditions can also see the risk of their medical expenses increase once they are taken off Britain’s protection.

A similar situation is also feared by British living in France and can have the same consequences as British citizens living in Spain. Not only would these people be deprived of a good medical plan, but they would soon come back to Britain for the rest of their lives to gain the benefits of a healthcare plan. This is not only going to be a tremendous change for their lives but can really upset the medical system and may have the potential to change the prices of treatments. The only hope for the UK is to build a concrete plan and work with its European neighbors to support its citizens living in their countries.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Join the Hive!

Featured Stings

Germany tries to save Europe from war between Ukraine and Russia

After Brexit and Grexit, Brussels to deal with Poloust

UN chief condemns suspected Boko Haram attacks targeting Eid al-Fitr celebrations in Nigeria

Let your fingers do the walking

Work Together to Build a New Type of International Relations and a Community with a Shared Future for Humanity

EU presses India for a free trade agreement

To my Chinese friend

Advocate General ‘outlaws’ Data Retention Directive

MEPs Anti-fraud votes for more votes?

Iran nuclear talks’ deadline extended: the match is still open for many

Fisherwomen of Lake Chad show optimism in face of multiple challenges

On International Youth Day the European Youth Forum calls for true youth participation

How the EU sees its own and Russia’s role in Ukraine

EU’s new environmental policy on biofuels impacts both the environment and the European citizen

Changing the EU copyright law won’t bring us much closer to Digital Single Market

EU readies for eventual annulment of the Turkish agreement on immigrants-refugees

From inconvenience to opportunity: the importance of international medical exchanges

Juncker Investment Plan for Europe welcomed by European Youth Forum

Eurozone: A Sluggish economy offers no extra jobs

Global Citizen-Volunteer Internships

The developing countries keep the world going

EU Parliament: A catastrophic crisis management by European leaders

Vulnerable young people must not be blamed & stigmatised for violent radicalisation

Commission presents far-reaching anti-tax evasion measures

Trump goes ahead with plan to undo globalization; targets China and EU

Young people meet in Malta to shape the future of Europe

EU/Africa, Caribbean and Pacific: towards which partnership?

“None of our member states has the dimension to compete with China and the US, not even Germany!”, Head of EUREKA Pedro Nunes on another Sting Exclusive

Why medicine is relevant to the battle against climate change

UN chief welcomes resolution to 27-year-old disagreement over renaming the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Will GDPR block Blockchain?

Hostilities in Syria’s southwest, mean cuts in vital aid across Jordanian border: Senior UN official

Politics needs to “Youth UP” in order the ensure the future of our democracies

‘Free state aid’ for imprudent banks

EU prolongs economic sanctions on Russia by six months

Unemployment and exclusion brings EU cities to boiling point

EU Commission: Germany can make Eurozone grow again just by helping itself

Greece did it again

European Investment Bank to borrow €70 billion in 2013

EU summit: Are the London Tories planning an exit from the EU?

Have central banks missed the exit train?

Syria: Civilians caught in crossfire, UN refugee chief urges Jordan to open its border

Is Eurozone heading for disinflation?

EU elections: The louder the threats and the doomsaying the heavier the weight of the vote

Nicaragua: MEPs condemn brutal repression and demand elections

Latest leaked TTIP document confirms EU sovereignty may be under threat

Eurozone stuck in a high risk deflation area; Draghi expects further price plunge

Τhe EU Refugee Crisis: a day in the life of a Refugee in Greece

ECB reaches the boundaries of its mandate to revive the entirety of Eurozone

Easing funding woes for UN agency assisting Palestine refugees a ‘wise investment for today and the future’

European financial values on the rise

The European Sting @ European Business Summit 2014 – the preview

How young entrepreneurs should be supported: what assistance should governments provide?

‘Agile’, multilateral response vital to combat terrorism – UN chief Guterres

Global Citizen-Volunteer Internships

Migration crisis will keep deteriorating as common EU political will is simply not there

JADE visits Lithuanian Junior Initiatives

Eurozone to enter the winter…

EU Court of Justice invalidates Safe Harbour and the game for thousands US businesses suddenly changes

More Stings?

Comments

  1. naimah yianni says:

    This article is quite factually incorrect. At the moment we don´t know what is going to happen to healthcare and we don´t know what will happen to the EHIC card as there are other countries which are part of the EHIC scheme who are not actually EU. I live in Spain, and if you work here and pay tax, your healthcare will carry on as before. To live here it is a legal requirement to be a resident, by the way, so in fact most people who live here are permanent residents.

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s