Will Europe be able to deal with the migration crisis alone if Turkey quits the pact?

Handshake between Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, on the right, and Dimitris Avramopoulos Location: Ankara – Turkey. Date: 04/04/2016. Source: EC - Audiovisual Service. © European Union, 2016. Photo: Adem Altan

Handshake between Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, on the right, and Dimitris Avramopoulos
Location: Ankara – Turkey. Date: 04/04/2016.
Source: EC – Audiovisual Service.
© European Union, 2016. Photo: Adem Altan

The European Union keeps on focusing on the implementation of the EU-Turkey agreement on the migration crisis despite being threatened by Turkey that the latter will step off the deal if the EU will not keep its last March’s promises.

The European Commission is determined not to let Turkey leave so easily and aims at financially supporting refugees in Turkey through the Facility for Refugees which was set up with a total budget of 3 billion euros for 2016-2017.

However, Recep Tayyip Erdogan mentioned last week that Europe has failed to comply with its commitments on financial support and visa requirements.

Turkey puts extra pressure on visa deliberations

After the recent failed coup attempt in Turkey, the current situation is changing rapidly. Turkey is now blackmailing Europe that will leave the refugees deal if the EU will not grant visa-free travel to its citizens. More in detail, the Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu mentioned to the German Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung  (FAZ) that “if the EU did not grant visa-free travel to Turkish citizens, then it would abandon the March 18 Turkey-EU migrant deal.”

Hence, it is more than clear now that the Turkish government wants to gain as much as possible by threatening Europe with the millions of refugees who currently live in Turkey and are desperately looking for a way to travel to Europe.

A successful deal despite the threats

The EU bloc states through its officials that is not going to be blackmailed by Turkey and its president. More specifically, the German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier told the Rheinische Post newspaper that “it is absurd” to say that Turkey could blackmail the EU over the immigration agreement. Furthermore, the German vice-chancellor Sigmar Gabriel mentioned last Monday that “Germany or Europe must in no way let themselves be blackmailed by Turkey over the migrants’ pact”.

On the contrary, the Brussels is trying hard to uphold its side of the migration deal keeping the influx of refugees at low levels and control this long-lasting issue. Commission’s spokeswoman Mina Andreeva told reporters in Brussels yesterday: “The commission has a Plan A and that is to make the EU-Turkey deal work successfully. It is not a plan that we have been pursuing just since yesterday. We have had a comprehensive European agenda for migration since 2015 and we spent the last 15 months on delivering on this agenda. This is our plan and we will continue to deliver and work on that in order to address the refugee crisis and assist the countries under pressure.”

Europe’s financial support to migrants in Turkey

The EU is doing its part to the migration agreement disbursing 1.4 billion euros in support of refugees who fled from the war in Syria to Turkey and to assist their host communities. The adoption of such a Special Measure will support refugees in Turkey in the areas of education, health, municipal and social infrastructure, and socio-economic support.

Thus, the EU is determined to maintain its commitments to the migration pact contributing greatly to the implementation of the Facility for Refugees in Turkey bringing the total amount mobilised to more than 2 billion euros.

Europe faces great risk if the deal is off

Despite the fact that Europe does not seem to be blackmailed by the Turkish threats, it is very likely that the EU-Turkey deal on migration could be canceled. The latter will signal tremendous consequences to Europe which will find itself once more in a dead-end.

The International Organization for Migration has already revealed a climb to the refugees’ numbers since the military coup in Turkey on July 15. It is observed a 111% increase from July 14-20 to July 21-28. Therefore, it is certain that the European officials have understood that there is a great danger in the near future. “The success of the deal is fragile”, as the president of the European Commission stated to an Austrian newspaper last Saturday.

All in all, the migration crisis seems to be suddenly worsening again post the coup era. The need for constructive monitoring of the developments is essential and the EU officials and leaders have better already start thinking of ways on how to face the additional thousands of migrants fleeing to Europe in case the migration pact with Turkey breaks.

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Changing healthcare systems with simple technological solutions

The financial sector cripples Eurozone growth prospects

Women must be at ‘centre of peacekeeping decision-making’, UN chief tells Security Council

Black babies more likely to survive when cared for by Black doctors, suggests new study

Ahead of key UN-backed Marrakech migration conference, youth recount harrowing journeys

Is your smart home as safe as you think?

Deal on faster exchange of non-EU nationals’ criminal records

Brussels terrorist attacks: Schengen in danger once again while leaders gather Europe’s multiple broken pieces

Space science now a ‘fundamental pillar’ of 21st century human development: top UN space official

It’s time to ‘eliminate the scourge of conflict-related sexual violence’, urges UN chief

Commission assesses and sets out reform priorities for the countries aiming to join the EU

UN-led Yemen ceasefire monitoring team gets ready to begin operations

Further reforms needed for a stronger and more inclusive Argentine economy

Germany tries to save Europe from war between Ukraine and Russia

EU leaders slammed on anti-tax evasion inaction and expensive energy

What’s an ‘essential service’? Not knowing could block access to key digital services during COVID

DiscoverEU: 15,000 travel passes up for grabs to explore the EU this summer

Artificial Intelligence raises ethical, policy challenges – UN expert

Brussels to tear down the trade wall with Mexico as opposed to Trump’s “walls”

The impact of COVID-19 pandemic on mental health

5 surprising ways digital technology is changing childhood

EU Youth Conference in Amsterdam: enabling young people to engage in a diverse, connected and inclusive Europe

CEOs as activists: should leaders speak up about social causes?

Alarming number of Ebola deaths in DRC a ‘rallying cry’ to scale up treatment

Three trends shaping the future of mobility in 2020

How Africa’s women can drive the 4IR forward

More attacks, ‘persisting security challenges’ threaten progress in West Africa, Sahel

EU-China: Council authorises signature of the agreement on geographical indications

COP21 Breaking News_03 December: Argentina Accepts KP Amendment

Remarks by H.E. Ambassador Zhang Ming At the Reception in Celebration of the 70th Anniversary of the Founding of the People’s Republic of China

‘I thought I’d never get out alive’ – the Muslim director who interviewed neo-Nazis

Dark spots on EU humanitarian aid spending

Want a fairer society? This economist says he has the answer

European Commission calls on national political parties to join efforts to ensure free and fair elections in Europe

Norway is known for its cold weather – but it’s been in the grip of a severe heatwave

UK must end ‘unlawful’ administration of Chagos Archipelago ‘as rapidly as possible,’ top UN court rules

We need better alignment between climate and trade. Here’s a roadmap

Using the quarantine to your advantage

ECB reaches the boundaries of its mandate to revive the entirety of Eurozone

Green Deal: measures to step up the fight against global deforestation

Tourism and transport: Commission’s guidance on how to safely resume travel and reboot Europe’s tourism in 2020 and beyond

Macron defends the idea of European sovereignty

At last some rules on banks

Vaccines: from miracle to possible danger

Iran: BBC and other broadcast journalists harassed; families threatened – UN experts

The European Commission, European Investment Bank and Breakthrough Energy Ventures establish a new €100 million fund to support clean energy investments

Coronavirus Response: Commission welcomes ‘Best Practices’ to provide relief for consumers and businesses

Better air pollution data is helping us all breathe easier. Here’s how

How a 3-point plan could help rebuild business for the long-term

Corruption undermines democracy and contributes to instability, warns senior UN anti-crime official

Close to final agreement on the EU Banking Union

5 charts that explain big challenges facing Italy’s new government

Take Care of In Order to Be Taken Care of

We’re all in the same boat on the SDGs. Here’s how we steer a course

Global aid needed for healthcare

European Commission: Does Apple, Starbucks and Fiat really pay their taxes?

Practicing healthcare: Skills of a good healthcare professional and its effects

How Sierra Leone is using 3D printing to become a model state

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Latest news from Monday’s World Health Organization briefing

Security Council gravely concerned by Ebola outbreak in DR Congo, demands immediate end to violence hampering response

More Stings?

Advertising

Comments

  1. Lobby Ludd says:

    As the EU is the biggest contributor to Turkeys economy. Plus Ford, Hyundai etc all have EU subsidised plants in Turkey.
    If Erdogen won’t play ball, just stop trade and handouts and see how long Erdogen remains in Power

Trackbacks

  1. […] Will Europe be able to deal with the migration crisis alone if Turkey quits the pact? The European Sting August 4 […]

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s