COP21 Paris agreement: a non legally-binding climate pact won’t stop effectively global warming while EU’s Cañete throws hardest part to next Commission

Paris COP21 Agreement UN 12 DecemberLast Saturday the COP21 Paris agreement was unanimously signed by 195 countries in Le Bourget, France. Everyone voted in favor of the new attempt to reverse the downhill of our planet regarding temperature rise and agreed to take all the necessary actions to cut all fossil fuels subsidies by the end of this century. This is seen by many scientists and mainly politicians as the forerunner to deal with climate change and leading to a cleaner environment.

If one takes a good look at this agreement though, she will realise that it is not legally binding for the nations involved. The latter basically means that a country is not subject to sanctions in case it will not meet the climate targets set to address the reduction of the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). This was obviously the only way to persuade some of the biggest economies of the world such as U.S., China, India and others to sign the climate change pact. It has to be noted also that this is the final draft version which must be ratified by at least 55 nations that represent 55% of the global warming emissions.

Paris Agreement’s goals

The major concern of the world’s community regarding climate change is to limit global warming. This goal is addressed at this agreement and the target is to manage global temperature increase to well below the threshold of 2 degrees Celsius and reduce it even more up to 1,5 degrees. However, this long-term goal seems quite unrealistic if one takes into account that the global temperature has risen almost 1 degree so far. What is more, analysts have calculated that the global temperature will rise 2,7 degrees with the current emission cuts pledges made till now; something that will cause devastating consequences not only to our planet but to humankind as well forcing numerous populations to migrate. PwC’s consultants underscored the gap between current policies and the 2 degrees goal. Countries must double their carbon-cutting efforts from 3 to 6.3% per year in order to reach it according to that study.

Another noteworthy target that is written inside the 31-page Paris agreement is that countries must reevaluate their pledges before 2020 and continue doing so every five years thereafter. This is a constructive way to produce better intended nationally determined contributions (INDC) every five years, adding to the improvement of the emissions cuts. More specifically, each country’s pledge must “represent a progression” on their previous one “and reflect its highest possible ambition”.

The long-lasting issue that involves the climate funding of the poorer developing countries is also taken into account during the negotiations of this agreement. The amount of $100 billion will be invested every year until 2025 in order to help nations that are under-developed to reduce their GHG and to promote “greener” technologies. The financial aid is supposed to be increased in the years to come post 2025. Nonetheless, it needs to be mentioned that developing countries had insisted on making this a legally-binding commitment but unfortunately it was not accepted due to the disagreement of economies like the U.S.

EU green targets

Europe has been one of the leading powers in the climate change fight. So far it has almost reached its 2020 pledges which are to reduce its GHG by 20% compared to 1990 levels. The next optimistic target is to cut emissions by at least 40% by 2030, a target that is quite ambitious but towards the right path to put a permanent stop to fossil fuels by 2100.

However, the climate and energy commissioner Miguel Arias Canete mentioned two days ago at a Brussels press conference that the EU is not going to promote any more grandiose plans before 2020. More in detail, Mr Canete stated: “In 2020 we can come along with more ambition but it will be for the next commission”.  Emissions are expected to fall from 22-27% by 2020 but there is still room for improvement while Adidas, Puma, Aldi and 27 other German businesses urged Brussels last Monday to adopt tougher targets by changing its target from 27 to 40%.

Is the Paris Agreement just about promises?

Professor James Hansen, also known as the “father of climate change awareness” characterised the climate change pact signed in Paris as “fraud” and that there is “no action, just promises”. The climate specialist added also that “we’ll have a 2C warming target and then try to do a little better every five years. It’s just worthless words. As long as fossil fuels appear to be the cheapest fuels out there, they will be continued to be burned”.

If one considers that this agreement comes after the failure in Copenhagen in 2009, then this is a great success. But does it have a practical impact on climate? Possibly Mr Hansen is right when he said that it is just promises because when a country is voluntarily setting its climate goals and can disobey at any time, then it is not enough to win this fierce race.

All in all, there is still a dear need for initiatives addressed to businesses and people to support climate following techniques that will reduce emissions and global warming effectively.

Follow Chris on Twitter @CAnyfantis

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Featured Stings

Will the three major parties retain control of the new EU Parliament?

Why will Paris upcoming “loose” climate change agreement work better than the previous ones?

IMF’s Lagarde to Peoples of the world: You have to work more for the banks!

LEAGUE OF YOUNG VOTERS LAUNCHES TOOL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE TO COMPARE POLITICAL PARTIES AHEAD OF EU ELECTIONS

EU labour mobility: Inconvenient truths for everybody

Eurozone retail sales fall shows recession

Industrial price dive may lead to point of no return

US, Russia oblige each other in Syria and Ukraine selling off allies

Medical students: The need for emigration

The challenges of mental health: an inconvenient reality

A Sting Exclusive: “Digital and mobile technologies are helping to achieve an economic success in Spain”, the Spanish Secretary of State for Telecommunications and Information Society Víctor Calvo-Sotelo reveals to the Sting at Mobile World Congress 2015

Cameron readies to support ‘yes’ for Britain in the EU

Ship Recycling is the Commission’s Titanic

EU to fail 2050 Green targets due to lack of European citizens’ engagement

Refugee crisis update: Commission is struggling alone with little help from EU or G7 leaders

Italy’s rescue operation Mare Nostrum shuts down with no real replacement. EU’s Triton instead might put lives at risk

‘Habitual residence’ rules deprive EU workers from social benefits

‘Free state aid’ for imprudent banks

Europe to turn the Hamburg G20 Summit into a battlefield

EU and India re-open talks over strategic partnership while prepare for a Free Trade Agreement

Will Eurozone be able to repay its debts? Is a bubble forming there?

Will Europe be a different place this Monday?

EU revengefully shows no mercy to Cameron by demanding a fast and sloppy Brexit now

“For my children Italy will be an innovation lab and not a museum”; the Sting reports live from World Economic Forum 2015 in Davos

The world to teach Germans to…un-German

Scotland “shows the way” to separatist movements as Catalonia calls a vote on independence

Draghi hands over to banks €77.7 billion more

The EU Diplomacy in North Korea promotes peace or war?

Why the ECB prepares to flood the markets with more and free of charge euro; everybody needs that now

Germany and Europe prepare for Trump’s America

China in my eyes

What will the US look like under Trump? Was his election campaign a big scam?

Eurozone economy desperately needs internally driven growth

EU makes key TTIP document public as protests get louder

China, forever new adventures

Russia won’t let Ukraine drift westwards in one piece

Trade deals’ pure realism: it may take 10 years for a post-Brexit agreement

A Sting Exclusive: “There can be no global deal on emissions without China and the USA”, Conservative MEP Ian Duncan stresses from Brussels

Huawei answers allegations about its selling prices

Launch of Pact for Youth: European Youth Forum calls for real business engagement

Real EU unemployment rate at 10.2%+4.1%+4.7%: Eurostat Update

Eurozone business activity again on upwards path

Climate change and its adverse impacts on health

ECB should offer more and cheaper liquidity if Eurozone is to avoid recession

October’s EU strong digital mix: From Safe Harbour to Net Neutrality, Roaming and Snowden

Drawing scenarios for drifting Britain; elections or May’s deadlock?

Nitrate pollution of water sources: new impulses for EU Water Policy?

ECB: A revolutionary idea to revitalize the European economy with cheap loans to SMEs

Spanish vote – bad luck for Greece: Does Iphigenia need to be sacrificed for favourable winds to blow in Eurozone?

Foreign direct investments the success secrete of Eurozone

MWC 2016 LIVE: Stripe gives payments leg-up to startups in emerging markets

US – Russia bargain on Syria, Ukraine but EU kept out

The importance of exchanges for the medical students of the world

The ECB will do whatever it takes to set the Eurozone economy again in motion

Commission: Raising the social issues that can make or break the monetary union

Human rights in Brussels and in Beijing: a more balanced approach needed

Mental health of health professionals: the alter ego

Young people are Europe’s biggest value and hope

EU plans to exploit the Mediterranean Sea and the wealth beneath it

ILO: Unemployment to increase by 8.1 million in 2013-2014

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s