Why impoverishment and social exclusion grow in the EU; the affluent north also suffers

Marianne Thyssen, Member of the EC in charge of Employment, Social Affairs, Skills and Labour Mobility, participated in the 4th Annual Convention of the European Platform against Poverty and Social Exclusion. Obviously the EU doesn’t focus where the real needs are. Brussels prefers to promote its own irrelevant actions and faces. (EC Audiovisual Services. Location: Brussels - The Egg).

Marianne Thyssen, Member of the EC in charge of Employment, Social Affairs, Skills and Labour Mobility, participated in the 4th Annual Convention of the European Platform against Poverty and Social Exclusion. Obviously the EU doesn’t focus where the real needs are. Brussels prefers to promote its own irrelevant actions and faces. (EC Audiovisual Services. Location: Brussels – The Egg).

The European Union which mobilizes its warships to keep the flows of poor and destitute refugees and immigrants out of its supposedly prosperous interior, at the same is impotent to offer to its own citizens not a prosperous life but not even a secure economic and social environment. According to Eurostat, the EU’s statistical service, “In 2014, 122 million people, or 24.4% of the population, in the European Union (EU) were at risk of poverty or social exclusion”. It’s not a war with guns and air raids but still it’s a war with financial and economic means that impoverished and ostracized one quarter of EU citizens.

Risking everything

The part of a population at ‘risk of poverty or social exclusion’ comprises three categories of people: those hit by income poverty plus those being severely materially deprived and finally those who live in households with ‘low work intensity’. In short, one in every four EU citizens falls in one of those three categories. Understandably, the 2008 -2010 financial crisis worsened this deplorable situation. The percentage of people in the above groups kept increasing after 2008.

Unfortunately, the highly advertised recovery of the EU economy after the second quarter of 2013 didn’t change that. Even in Germany the population at risk of poverty or social exclusion was in 2014 above the 2008 levels, with 20.6% and 20.1% respectively. The same is true for the entire EU; the 2014 overall figure remains above the 2008 levels.

Who pays the dearest price

In 2014 more than one third of the population in three member states was at risk of poverty or social exclusion, in Romania (40.1%), Bulgaria (40.2%) and Greece (36%). Surprisingly enough, the lowest percentage of citizens in this category was observed in an non-affluent country, the Czech Republic, with 14.8%, while Sweden turned out the second lowest figure at 16.9% and the Netherlands at 17.1%.

Not unexpectedly, between 2008 and 2014, the largest increases of this unlucky part of the population were found in countries worst hit by the financial crisis. In this respect Greece is a typical case, with this percentage jumping from 28.1% to 36% between 2008 and 2014. The same negative development was observed in Spain with an increase from 24.5% to 29.2%. Cyprus is the third country with the largest increase of the percentage of people in this category in the same six-year period, from 23.3% to 27.4% between 2008 and 2014.

Income poverty

As mentioned above, there are three sub-categories of people at risk of poverty or social exclusion. The largest one is the people at risk of ‘income poverty’. It’s about those who may be working even full-time but gain so little that their disposable income remains below the national at-risk-of-poverty threshold. Mind you this is happening in the European Union that the world considers to be an island of prosperity and social justice. One can imagine what everyday life is like for the average working people elsewhere in the planet.

Coming back to Europe, it is interesting to note that the sub category of people at risk or income poverty is steadily increasing throughout the 2018 -2014 period. And this tendency continued during the years after 2012 in which period a lot of European politicians, dignitaries and bureaucrats insisted that the EU had entered into a growth path. The percentage of EU citizens at income poverty was 16.6% in 2008 and increased to 17.2% in 2014. Reportedly this trend is still valid.

It’s the inequality stupid

A similar trend was more or less likely to occur in countries which have lost a larger or smaller part of their GDP in the post crisis period like Greece, Spain, Italy, Ireland, Portugal, Cyprus and others. However, the continuous increase of the percentage of the population at income poverty (after social transfers) remains a fact even for member states like Germany (from 15.2% to 16.7%) and Sweden (from 12.2% to 15.1%). Both those affluent countries have managed to steadily increase, albeit slowly, their GDP during the period in question. Yet they didn’t avoid a worsening of income poverty.

Severely materially deprived

Let’s pass on now to the category of severely materially deprived people. According to Eurostat, “Severely materially deprived persons have living conditions severely constrained by lack of resources, they experience at least 4 out of the 9 following deprivations items: cannot afford i) to pay rent or utility bills, ii) keep home adequately warm, iii) face unexpected expenses, iv) eat meat, fish or a protein equivalent every second day, v) a week holiday away from home, vi) a car, vii) a washing machine, viii) a color TV, or ix) a telephone”.

The same source found that roughly one out of ten people (8.9%) in the EU fall in this category. Needless to say that Bulgaria (33.1%), Romania (26.3%), Hungary (23.9%) and Greece (21.5%) top the list. Those percentages are appalling. They mean that one in three or one in five persons cannot support a warm home or have a protein meal every two days, let alone own a car, a color TV or a washing machine.

Low ‘work intensity’

Last but not least, in the analysis of poverty and social exclusion comes the sub-category of the EU citizens who live in households with ‘very low work intensity’. They are roughly one out of ten (11%). Again Greece and Spain lead the catalog with 17.1% and 17.2% respectively. According to Eurostat “People living in households with very low work intensity are people aged 0-59 living in households where the adults work less than 20% of their total work potential during the past year”. In the above mentioned countries almost one out of five people live in households where unemployment reigns.

Non-standard forms of employment

It’s shocking though to notice that in this respect, in the affluent north EU member states, the situation is also deplorable albeit less extreme. The relevant figure in Belgium is 14.6%, in the Netherlands 11.1%, in Britain 10.4% and in Germany 10%. In all those member states the overall unemployment rate remains at very low single digit figures. The contradiction between the statistically low unemployment rate and the high percentages of ‘very low work intensity’ of households cannot be easily explained. An obvious cause for this antithesis can be the increasing exploitation of non-standard forms of employment which vary widely between the EU member states.

Invariably, the standard form of employment can be defined as a full-time job in one employer. Unquestionably, the non-standard forms undermine the rights of workers and the end results are a much reduced pay, irregular work timetables and abated social insurance coverage and pension schemes, if any at all. Not to forget that in many EU countries, not necessarily in the less affluent ones, an increasing part of the labor force is employed in the dark side of the labor market outside any legal scheme, reminding in many respects modern slavery.

The new immigrants and refugees are more vulnerable to such treatment. Not surprisingly then why Germany boasts it can absorb 800.000 refugees and immigrants this year. The German employers have an excellent know-how of how to exploit various non-standard forms of employment.

The most sticking consequences of the rapid expansion of the non-standard forms of employment during the past few years are the double digit ‘income poverty’ and the severe material deprivation. In short, those have become the key characteristics of our brave new European Union.

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

These are the world’s most fragile states in 2019

What Keynes can teach us about government debt today

ECB steadily continues monetary easing policy as EU economy gains momentum

IMF’s Lagarde: Estimating Cyber Risk for the Financial Sector

COVID-19 tracing apps: MEPs stress the need to preserve citizens’ privacy

Building an Inclusive ICT Innovation Ecosystem

Malta: Human rights experts call for justice in case of murdered journalist

Wind farms now provide 14% of EU power – these countries are leading the way

EU budget 2019 approved: focus on the young, innovation and migration

Yemen: ‘Living hell’ for all children, says UNICEF; Angelia Jolie calls for ‘lasting ceasefire’

Earthquake: Monte Dei Paschi Di Siena

Summer 2019 Economic Forecast: Growth clouded by external factors

The sad plight of fledging doctors

UN experts decry torture of Rakhine men and boys held incommunicado by Myanmar’s military

MWC 2016 LIVE: Telenor CEO calls on operators to embrace Mobile Connect initiative

Holocaust survivors rebuild lives and traditions in Rio de Janeiro

Does the world have strong enough institutions to handle risks like Trump and Brexit?

‘Air bridge’ vaccination operation begins for Ebola-hit communities in DR Congo

Over 85% of European bathing sites rated as excellent for water quality

Why do medical students need to emigrate to become doctors in 2017?

EU Commission: Growth first then fiscal consolidation

Pay packet inequality growing worldwide, says new UN report

EU job-search aid worth €9.9m for 1,858 former Air France workers

European Agenda on Migration: Still fragile situation gives no cause for complacency

Infringement – Commission takes Italy to Court for its incomplete regime of access to genetic resources

In Finland, speeding tickets are linked to your income

What can Darwin teach the aviation industry about cybersecurity?

EU budget 2021-2027: Commission calls on leaders to set out a roadmap towards an autumn agreement

More efforts needed to boost trust in business and finance

Resolving banks with depositors’ money?

INTERVIEW: ‘Defend the people, not the States’, says outgoing UN human rights chief

COVID-19 has accelerated India’s digital reset

Why cities hold the key to safe, orderly migration

Prevention is key to ‘breaking the cycle of HIV transmission’, UN chief tells General Assembly

UN must bring more women police officers into the fold to be effective – UN peacekeeping official

UN chief lauds Fijians as ‘natural global leaders’ on climate, environment, hails ‘symbiotic relationship’ with land and sea

Getting vaccinated should just be considered a human right?

Tuesday’s Daily Brief: #GlobalGoals progress, essential meds, updates from Cox’s Bazar, Sudan and DR Congo

On European immigration: Europe’s Missing Citizens

Confirmed ‘Blue Line’ tunnels ‘do not appear’ to surface in Israel – UN peacekeeping chief

Burundi: Inclusive dialogue ‘only viable option’ for resolving country’s political crisis says, UN envoy

Military escalation will have ‘serious consequences’ for Yemeni civilians, warns UN Special Envoy

With 10 million Yemenis ‘one step away from famine’, donors pledge $2.6 billion

Eurozone: Sovereign debt decreases for the first time since 2007

‘Champion for multilateralism’ readies to hand over UN General Assembly gavel

How to bring precision medicine into the doctor’s office

How to survive and thrive in our age of uncertainty

These countries are driving global demand for coal

From cheeseburgers to coral reefs, the science of decision-making can change the world

How women in developing countries can harness e-commerce

Governments can fight corruption by joining the digital payment revolution

The megatrend that will shape our working future

African economies sustain progress in domestic resource mobilisation

Vulnerable children face ‘dire and dangerous’ situation on Greek island reception centres, UNICEF warns

World ‘not yet on track’ to ensure children a better future: UN rights chief

MWC 2016 LIVE: Ingenu steps up efforts to build LPWA networks across the globe

Remarks by H.E. Ambassador Zhang Ming At the Reception in Celebration of the 70th Anniversary of the Founding of the People’s Republic of China

Parliament approves €500 million for schooling of refugee children in Turkey

Libya: UN Mission condemns deadly attack against police in country’s south-east

United States: UN chief ‘deeply saddened’ by deadly California wildfires

More Stings?

Advertising

Comments

  1. Definitely believe that which you stated. Your favourite justification appeared to be on the web the simplest thing to be aware
    of. I say to you, I certainly get annoyed whilst other folks consider issues that they just do not know
    about. You managed to hit the nail upon the top and defined out the whole thing without having side-effects
    , other people could take a signal. Will likely be again to get more.
    Thank you

  2. Thanks , I have recently been looking for information about this topic
    for ages and yours is the greatest I’ve came upon till now.
    But, what concerning the conclusion? Are you positive concerning the source?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s