Europe slammed by Turkey’s shaky Erdoğan; both playing with immigrants’ agony

European Council - October 2015. The heads of State or Government of the EU meet in Brussels on 15 October 2015 to focus on migration in its various aspects. From left to right: Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission, Angela Merkel, German Federal Chancellor. (European Council – Council of the European Union. Shoot location: Brussels – Belgium. Shoot date: 15/10/2015. Copyright Credit 'The European Union').

European Council – October 2015. The heads of State or Government of the EU meet in Brussels on 15 October 2015 to focus on migration in its various aspects. From left to right: Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission and Angela Merkel, German Federal Chancellor hold a serious and rather difficult conversation. (European Council – Council of the European Union. Shoot location: Brussels – Belgium. Shoot date: 15/10/2015. Copyright Credit ‘The European Union’).

Probably the greatest achievement of last Thursday’s European Council was that its conclusions were refuted within hours after they were published. While the official text of the Council results boasts about a “joint action plan with Turkey”, to stem the immigration flows to the EU, the Turkish minister of Foreign Affairs Feridun Sinirlioglu commented otherwise. He said that the plan to curtail the immigration flows through his country to Europe, which Turkey is currently negotiating with the EU, is just a very early draft. Sinirlioglu added a thorny remark, that Turkey had warned months ago the Europeans about their faulty strategy which focuses on security issues.

It seems that Turkey plans to invest a lot on the project the Europeans are proposing. The Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, a number of government ministers and Ömer Çelik, the spokesman of the ruling AK Party, all made clear that the discussion between their country and the EU about managing the flow of immigrants invariably comprises Turkey’s overall relations with the European Union.

Turkey wants it all

Erdoğan went even further and appeared as seeking revenge for his country’s EU integration process being kept in the European fridge for many years now. He said that now it’s too late for the EU to recognize the importance of Turkey in the management of the Syrian immigration flows. He even went as far as to point the finger to the EU and the West as a whole, obviously targeting the US also, by saying that “their security depends on us and now they accept it”.

Such a Turkish all-encompassing rhetoric is not unusual. Ankara’s foreign policy is traditionally conducted in tight relation to the always turbulent internal canvas and the country’s abyssal needs. Apropos, Turkey is to hold a general election on 1 November, the second in six months. In this poll Erdoğan’s political future and in many ways the stability of his country are clearly at stake.

Erdoğan in dire straights

Last June the Turkish President suffered a devastating electoral defeat. He was hoping that his AK party was set to win a swelled majority in the Parliament, large enough to introduce a constitutional amendment and transform Turkey into a Presidential democracy, obviously saving the top job for himself. Instead of that his AK party didn’t even win a large enough majority to form a viable government. Understandably then, Erdoğan’s rhetoric must be interpreted by the Europeans with one or both eyes on his chaotic home affairs. The latest tragedy in Ankara with the 102 fatalities and the hundreds of injured peaceful protesters is an indication of what may follow there.

Defying Brussels

Now, if the 1st November election again delivers a hung Parliament as the June poll did, the country will enter into a very dangerous path. Her multiple and deep internal divisions and the war Erdoğan started against the Kurd minorities in Turkey and Syria, may become a formidable boomerang. Add to that the totally wrong and shifting strategies that Ankara followed in the Syrian crisis and elsewhere and the account becomes insupportable.

In short, Ankara for various reasons, has confused all its major strategic allies including the EU, the US, Russia and even China. In this last case Ankara’s policies with the Chinese Muslim minority in Xinjiang, the Uighurs, have infuriated Beijing because Turkey treats them as the…Turks of China. It’s quite understandable then why Turkey presented a long and far reaching ‘shopping list’ to the 28 European leaders last Thursday in Brussels.

Contempt for the EU’s billions

Turkey’s representatives dismissed as irrelevant the billions of euros the EU appears ready to give to the country in order for this country to keep and maintain on its soil the Syrians, Iraqis and the other refugees coming en masse from everywhere. With an eye on the election and the burning internal problems of his country, Erdoğan asks from the Europeans for the moon on a stick in order to cooperate with Brussels. Indirectly he tries to use the immigrants issue as a leverage vis-a-vis the entire western strategy in the region, including of course the US designs. In view of that, more than one political analyst say that Angela Merkel’s visit to Turkey this week is a high risk game.

The Turkish contempt for the EU’s precious billions of euro promised in exchange for cooperation in the immigration problem is an infallible sign that Ankara will push its negotiating position to extremities. The extent of these extremes is directly related to the gravity of the current and the not so distant internal problems the country has to face. For example the Kurd question may entail a national catastrophe for Turkey. On top of this the de-facto dismembering of Syria and what Turkey can lose from it, is a major national security issue for Ankara. Add to that the dawning West-Russia rapprochement in Syria and all that leads to possible major disasters for Erdoğan and his country.

The gravity of all that was the reason why last Thursday’s European Council had nothing concrete to propose about the problems the EU faces in relation to the immigration issue. Nor did it have anything solid to say about Europe’s Middle East strategy and the role of Turkey in all that. Pathetically enough, Brussels has left those questions to Angela Merkel and Berlin to answer this week, while Paris and of course London closely follow the Washington strategy, if there is any.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Featured Stings

A Young entrepreneur cries out: “start in Europe, stay in Europe”

For the future of Europe youth remains a priority

ECB ready to counter the rise of the euro?

Galileo funding: A ‘small’ difference of €700 million

Commission challenges Council over EU 2014 budget

The refugee crisis brings to light EU’s most horrible flaws and nightmares

UN-based World Summit Award (WSA) presents its master list on digital innovation with impact on society from 24 countries

Predicting two more years of economic stagnation

Why Eurozone urgently needs the ECB to print and distribute at least €500 billion

Economic recovery won’t tackle youth unemployment problem

The Americans are preparing for the next financial crisis

The Irish Presidency bullies the Parliament over EU budget

Commission to decide on bank resolution issues

Cancer research put at risk by General Data Protection Regulation? The possible dangers of a data privacy EU mania

European Union disenchanted with Turkey

European Banking Union: no one is perfect

US – Russia bargain on Syria, Ukraine but EU kept out

Paris, Washington, IMF against Berlin and ECB on money and interest

How I met the Panda Woman

Why do thousands of migrants need to be drowned for Brussels to wake up?

Greece and Ukraine main items on EU28 menu; the course is set

China’s New Normal and Its Relevance to the EU

EU seeks foreign support on 5G from Mobile World Congress 2015 as the “digital gold rush” begins

The developing countries keep the world going

What do Europeans believe about the crisis and the possible way out?

UN Environment Assembly 2017: where the world convenes to #BeatPollution

Meet the Junior Enterprise network at JEWC 2014!

Irish Presidency: Not a euro more for EU budgets

Berlin vies for a Germanic European Central Bank

Mood changes in Europe in favour of growth and jobs

European Energy Union: Integration of markets and need for in-house energy production

Is Eurozone heading towards a long stagnation?

Brexit mission impossible: Theresa May was so desperate that had to appoint Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary

Mobile young people create the European labour market of tomorrow

EU’s tougher privacy rules: WhatsApp and Facebook set to be soon aligned with telcos

Brexiteer May gets lip-service from Trump and Turkish promises from Erdogan

Dreaming of China

Horse meat runs faster than authorities…

Why France, Italy and the US press Germany to accept a cheaper euro and pay for Greece

The European Parliament x-rays the troika’s doings

Azeri natural gas will keep the EU warm soon

EU Parliament: ECB accountable for not supporting real economy

Does Switzerland really need more medical students?

Syria: A bloody tracer of Trump – Putin rapprochement

Reality Shock

Global Citizen – Volunteer Internships

French election: Will France vote for a reformed or no EU?

Merkel had it her way with the refugees & immigrants but can Greece and Turkey deliver?

EU Migrant Crisis: Italian Coast Guard Headquarters and Italian Navy to give host national opening addresses at Border Security 2016 in Rome

MWC 2016 LIVE: Stripe gives payments leg-up to startups in emerging markets

EU fight against tax-evasion and money laundering blocked by Britain

The EU pollution rights trading system frozen

MWC 2016 LIVE: T-Mobile US reveals 5G trial plans

Youth policy in Europe not delivering for young people

Climate change and health: public health awareness in an international framework

EU free-trade agreements with Canada and US: imagine the fallout if put to national referendums

Why growth is now a one way road for Eurozone

What our leaders hide from us

A European Discovers China: 3 First Impressions

EU Council: The US airlines may freely pollute the European air

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s