How wealthy people transmit this advantage to their children and grand children

José Manuel Barroso, President of the EC, Herman van Rompuy, President of the European Council, and Martin Schulz, President of the EP, went to Oslo to participate in the award ceremony of the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize® to the EU. The three Presidents then participated in the "Save the children" event organised by Redd Barna, in the presence of Mette-Marit, Princess of Norway. (EC Audiovisual Services)

José Manuel Barroso, President of the EC, Herman van Rompuy, President of the European Council, and Martin Schulz, President of the EP, went to Oslo to participate in the award ceremony of the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize® to the EU. The three Presidents then participated in the “Save the children” event organised by Redd Barna, in the presence of Mette-Marit, Princess of Norway. (EC Audiovisual Services)

Eurostat, the European Union’s statistical service, published data on poverty and social exclusion risks for EU citizens in 2011, showing completely disappointing results. The interesting thing, however, is that Eurostat didn’t release similar data for previous years for comparison reasons. Given that the much-advertised by the Brussels EU bureaucracy, “Europe 2020 strategy”, has set as its main target the reduction of the number of persons at risk of poverty and social exclusion in the EU, this could lead a suspicious researcher to think that this strategy is a complete failure.

If this is the case, the European Commission must be held responsible for withholding vital information over a crucial issue, by not publishing older data permitting time comparisons. The same suspicious researcher could think that this quite unacceptable practice of hiding statistical data could be related to a severe deterioration of the poverty and social exclusion risks during the past few years.

Hiding data

Obviously, this deplorable development may be related to the other completely failed strategy imposed by the Commission on many EU member states and more so in those countries under direct Commission’s guidance, namely Greece, Portugal, Ireland, Spain and Italy. Obviously, the front loaded fiscal correction programmes imposed by Brussels and Berlin with an iron hand on many EU countries, is leading to a severe deterioration of poverty and social exclusion data. It is probably exactly this Eurostat wants to hide from the eyes of journalists and researches.

Let’s return, however, to the data for 2011 and their presentation as released by Eurostat. The conclusion Eurostat chooses to promote as its most important observation is the fact, which the risks of poverty and social exclusion for children less than 18 years of age are decreasing with the educational level of their parents. As if such a costly operation was needed, for a sound minded statistician, to arrive at this conclusion.

Eurostat promotes ideology?

Seemingly, Eurostat follows in this affair the ideological guidelines of Commission’s leadership, to advertise the rightfulness of the prerogative of the upper and more educated classes. The problem is, however, that Eurostat tells nothing about the inverse relationship that is between education attainments and parents’ income. In short, Eurostat again is caught not to tell the whole truth, because it hides the well-known and long-established by educational economists positive relation between parents’ income and education achievements.

In short, the grand parents’ income defined the risks of poverty and social exclusion of today’s children of less than 18 years of age, through the strong relation between their grand-parents income and the educational level of their parents. Yes, Mr Ollie Rehn, in our brave new world the basic variable is the income and not the educational level, as you want to make us believe.

Let’s now give the floor to Eurostat. The most important parts of its press release go as follows: “In the EU27 in 2011, 27% of children aged less than 18 were at risk of poverty or social exclusion. Risk of poverty decreases with increasing education level of parents…compared with 24% of adults (aged 18-64) and 21% of the elderly (aged 65 and over). Persons at risk of poverty or social exclusion are those who are at least in one of the following three conditions: living with disposable income below 60% of the national median or being severely materially deprived or live in households with very low work intensity.

In 2011, the highest shares of those age d less than 18 who were at risk of poverty or social exclusion were registered in Bulgaria (52%), Romania (49%), Latvia (44%), Hungary (40%) and Ireland (38% in 2010), and the lowest in Sweden, Denmark and Finland (all 16%), followed by Slovenia (17%), the Netherlands (18%) and Austria (19%)”.

More ideology

Eurostat keeps relating parents’ educational level with the risks of poverty and social exclusion for children under 18 as follows: “Looking in more detail at monetary poverty, almost half of all children whose parents had a low education level (at the most lower secondary education) were at risk of poverty in the EU27 in 2011, compared with 22% of children residing with parents who had a median education level (at the most upper secondary education) and 7% of children with parents with a higher education level (tertiary education)”.

The insistence of Eurostat to relate parents’ income with the risk of poverty and social exclusion of children is an infallible witness that this is an ideologically imposed tactic. As we proved above, family income is the first and prime causality for children’s welfare and not parents’ education. The educational level is just an interfering variable, which transmit the prerogative of wealth through education. If there were a better way to transmit this prerogative, the wealthy people would have chosen that one. Isn’t it like that Mr Rehn? Think about your parents and grand-parents.

the sting Milestones

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

UN refugee agency presses States to aid 49 refugees stranded on Mediterranean

The impossible end of the war in Syria

UN blue helmets in South Sudan use Sustainable Development Goals to help build peace

If on a summer’s night: is UK businesses’ “new deal” the only key to the “best of all worlds”?

Independent UN rights expert calls for compassion, not sanctions on Venezuela

Technology as an inclusion method while facing the COVID-19 pandemic: the “Coronavirus-SUS” app

Education in Emergencies: EU announces record humanitarian funding for 2019 and launches #RaiseYourPencil Campaign

What slums can teach us about building the cities of the future

Turkey: Commission continues humanitarian support for refugees

10 predictions for the global economy in 2019

The world’s most expensive places to own a home

UN chief welcomes formation of unity government in Madagascar

2019 EU Budget: Commission proposes a budget focused on continuity and delivery – for growth, solidarity, security

The technologies – and thoughtful collaborations – that can build resilience in the food system after COVID-19

Agreement reached on new EU Solidarity Corps

EU job-search aid worth €9.9m for 1,858 former Air France workers

EU to spend €135.5 billion in 2014 or 6.5% less than this year

The new general election will secure Greece’s position in Eurozone; at least for some time

UN Environment Assembly 2017: where the world convenes to #BeatPollution

India’s economy is growing fast, but its poorest areas lag behind. Here’s why this could be about to change

Greener economies and investment to reduce unemployment and increase global growth

Bringing justice to the people: how the UN is helping communities deal with disputes in remote and dangerous areas

Coronavirus: EU supports Member States with transport of essential supplies

The European Youth raises their voices this week in Brussels at Yo!Fest 2015

State aid: Commission approves €380 million German rescue aid to Condor

Are we at a turning point for tackling online extremism?

‘Harmonized’ plan launched to support millions of Venezuelan refugees and migrants

UN ‘regrets’ new US position on legality of Israeli settlements

Niger population’s suffering ‘increasing with each passing month’: UN Refugee Agency

Why the future for cars is connected

EU and World Health Organisation team up to boost access to health services in developing countries

Mobile technology: health in your hands

Venezuela’s needs ‘significant and growing’ UN humanitarian chief warns Security Council, as ‘unparalleled’ exodus continues

Global Citizen-Volunteer Internships

Open, inclusive and diverse cities are better for business and economic growth

The EU seals CETA but plans to re-baptise TTIP after missing the 2016 deadline

Drought in Europe: Commission presents additional measures to support farmers

Austria: reforms will be necessary to uphold high well-being levels

EU Budget 2019 deal: EP boosts support for researchers and the young

Global aid needed for healthcare

EU plans to exploit the Mediterranean Sea and the wealth beneath it

The future of energy is being shaped in Asia

How public transportation provides key lifelines during COVID-19

One Day in Beijing

Does the West play the Syrian game in Egypt?

These are the top 10 emerging technologies of 2019

Reckless Prescriptions: Lunatic Ideas Put By Great People Are Genius

High-technology manufacturing saves the EU industry

Agreement reached on screening of foreign direct investment for EU security

Politics is failing to protect the Amazon. It’s time for finance to step up instead

Mergers: Commission opens in-depth investigation into proposed acquisition of GRAIL by Illumina

Almost there: Equal healthcare for LGBTQI+

EU Commission and ECB rebuff Germany on the Banking Union

This Belgian start-up allows anyone to become an urban farmer

5 surprising ways to reuse coffee grounds

Is your smart home as safe as you think?

A Sting Exclusive: “The competitiveness of Europe depends on a digital single market”, EPP President Joseph Daul highlights live from European Business Summit 2015

How industrialisation could future-proof MENA’s Gulf economies

How the future of computing can make or break the AI revolution

Integration of migrants: Commission launches a public consultation and call for an expert group on the views of migrants

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s