EU summit: Are the London Tories planning an exit from the EU?

The British Prime Minister David Cameron bites his lips. Wonder why?

 

It’s not the first time that the European Union leaders are divided between the paymasters and the receivers. However during their last Summit of Thursday and Friday 22 and 23 November the 27 heads of states and governments were divided in more than three groups and left the conference room blaming each other, for the complete failure to set the EU budget lines for the next seven years.

Once more the main dissident was the British Prime Minister, David Cameron, but this time he was alone without the usual backing London gets from some central European member states like Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary. The three, love whatever is not German or Russian having paid dearly their geographical position between the two and believe whatever is written in English. Not now though. Money makes the old enmities to be forgotten.

All central and southern European Union members want a generous EU budget that Berlin doesn’t deny, which is quite the opposite Cameron could have brought happily back home. His Eurosceptic Tory colleagues would have torn him apart, not because he had forfeited the interests of the country, that he didn’t, but rather just because he had agreed with what Brussels proposed.

Cameron also suffered of solitude in the Belgian capital a year ago, towards the end of 2011, when he couldn’t find a fellow EU leader to have together a glass of trappist beer. At that time again Cameron was alone in opposing the creation of the European Stability Mechanism, despite the fact that all the other 26 EU leaders made clear to him, that the London City’s interests were not to be compromised. At that time the head of the Confederation of British Industry observed bitterly, that out of the hundreds of thousands of square miles of British soil the Prime Minister choose to protect the interests of the one on which the City seats.

What the Tories want

Tory Eurosceptic deputies and militants like Cameron’s crony but political enemy, Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson, the London Mayor, advertise their anti-Brussels sentiments on every occasion. Why? To answer this is not a difficult task. Those guys come from the same quarters of Tories that made Margaret Thatcher a glorious leader. What she did very successfully in the 1980s it was to abandon the industrial heart of Britain to its fate, at a time when all the other major European countries were spending billions to help their own outdated steel, iron and engineering industries to modernise and survive.

Why Thatcher did this dreadful thing, destroying industrial Britain? The answer is simple. Her likes were afraid of socialism! What socialism? The Labour Party’s socialism, and also because the industrial constituencies of Britain were voting Labour. Imagine the party of Tony Blair to turn Britain into a socialist country? Unthinkable! Yet still the Tories were afraid of that. This insanity cost Britain its solid industrial base. Now the country tries to survive selling real estate and catering to wealthy Arabs.

It seems however that the insanity is indigenous in the Conservative Party. Now again, despite the fact that what is left of the industrious Britain considers the EU membership as “sine qua non” for the country’s wellbeing and the people of the Confederation of British Industry point out that Britain without the EU will suffer, the Tories play again a card against those of their countrymen, who labour and produce goods and services sellable to the EU.

Unfortunately it seems that the London aristocracy, the back bone of the Tory Eurosceptic faction, will do whatever it takes to protect the financial industry of the City, even if this will cost dearly to the country as a whole. Why? Because the financiers of the City have made this square mile of the English soil worth its weight in gold. And guess what! This land belongs to the London aristocracy. Their children can also find lucrative jobs, actually doing nothing, in the City’s financial monsters.

One though cannot deny that there is an argument in favour of the City. It goes like that; this square mile produces almost one tenth of the British Gross National Product. However this is a total fallacy.  The last world credit crunch which culminated with the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers in New York in September 2008, had started in Britain during the spring of that year, with the failure of the Northern Rock Bank.

Today all the major banks of the country have being nationalised, swallowing hundreds of billions of pounds of taxpayers’ money. In reality the British financial industry is a ghost and the money it “produces” comes from the government coffers. Truly the role of the City is to redistribute the British GDP in favour of the few at the expenses of the many. This is what Cameron now protects, but understandably he does it with a good dose of unwillingness. If the English Eurosceptis have it their way, the country will end up in ruins.

There will be no other “deus ex machina” in the form of the oil discoveries in the North Sea, as last time when the country was saved by the black crude stuff after the Thatcherite calamity. Remember that the Thatcher era left Britain more indebted than before. It will be a tragedy if the crazy Tories drive their country out of the EU. Fortunately the Scots may have abandoned the ship before it sinks. Not to forget that the referendum for Scotland’s secession is scheduled for 2014.

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Comments

  1. Denis Hicks says:

    Terrible article. And does little to advance the fundamental debate about what the EU should be which is at the heart of the current conflict of opinions. Of course the UK has its national politics – does not every country? – and do they not all influence what happens in Brussels?

    The analysis of the Thatcher years is far to simplistic and, frankly naive. I was there. Please check what would have been required to save those industries for a country which was close to bankrupcy at the time and held hostage to union power which would directly benefit from goverment involvement.

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