State aid: Commission approves €1.9 billion Czech scheme to support companies in context of coronavirus outbreak

(Credit: Unsplash)

This article is brought to you in association with the European Commission.


The European Commission has approved an approximately € 1.9 billion (CZK 50 billion) Czech scheme to support companies affected by the coronavirus outbreak. The scheme was approved under the State aid Temporary Framework.

Executive Vice-President Margrethe Vestager, in charge of competition policy, said: “Many EU companies have seen their revenues and activities significantly decline because of the restrictive measures put in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus. This €1.9 billion Czech scheme will ensure liquidity support to companies affected by the coronavirus outbreak. We continue working in close cooperation with Member States to find workable solutions to mitigate the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak, in line with EU rules.

The Czech support measure

Czechia notified to the Commission an approximately €1.9 billion (CZK 50 billion) scheme, addressed to companies of all sizes and active in all sectors, except the financial sector.

Under the scheme, the aid will take the form of direct grants, guarantees or loans to compensate beneficiaries for the expenditures incurred in the period February 2020 to December 2021. Eligible companies are those that experienced a minimum decline in turnover in the range of 25% to 50% during the relevant period, if compared to the same period before the coronavirus outbreak. In the particular case of companies active in the cultural sector, the eligible ones are those that have been prevented or restricted from providing cultural services to the public because of the measures put in place by the government to limit the spread of the virus.

The aim of the scheme is to provide the beneficiaries with sufficient liquidity to continue their activities during and after the coronavirus outbreak.

The Commission found that the Czech measure is in line with the conditions set out in the Temporary Framework. In particular, (i) the aid will not exceed €225 000 per undertaking active in the primary production of agricultural products, €270 000 per undertaking active in the fishery and aquaculture sector and €1.8 million per undertaking for undertakings active in all other sectors; (ii) the aid will be granted before 31 December 2021; and (iii) in case of guarantees and loans granted through financial intermediaries, safeguards will be put in place to ensure that the advantage is passed onto final beneficiaries,.

The Commission concluded that the measure is necessary, appropriate and proportionate to remedy a serious disturbance in the economy of a Member State, in line with Article 107(3)(b) TFEU and the conditions set out in the Temporary Framework. On this basis, the Commission approved the measure under EU State aid rules.

Background

The Commission has adopted a Temporary Framework to enable Member States to use the full flexibility foreseen under State aid rules to support the economy in the context of the coronavirus outbreak. The Temporary Framework, as amended on 3 April, 8 May, 29 June, 13 October 2020 and 28 January 2021, provides for the following types of aid, which can be granted by Member States:

(i) Direct grants, equity injections, selective tax advantages and advance payments of up to €225,000 to a company active in the primary agricultural sector, €270,000 to a company active in the fishery and aquaculture sector and €1.8 million to a company active in all other sectors to address its urgent liquidity needs. Member States can also give, up to the nominal value of €1.8 million per company zero-interest loans or guarantees on loans covering 100% of the risk, except in the primary agriculture sector and in the fishery and aquaculture sector, where the limits of €225,000 and €270,000 per company respectively, apply.

(ii) State guarantees for loans taken by companies to ensure banks keep providing loans to the customers who need them. These state guarantees can cover up to 90% of risk on loans to help businesses cover immediate working capital and investment needs.

(iii) Subsidised public loans to companies (senior and subordinated debt) with favourable interest rates to companies. These loans can help businesses cover immediate working capital and investment needs.

(iv) Safeguards for banks that channel State aid to the real economy that such aid is considered as direct aid to the banks’ customers, not to the banks themselves, and gives guidance on how to ensure minimal distortion of competition between banks.

(v) Public short-term export credit insurance for all countries, without the need for the Member State in question to demonstrate that the respective country is temporarily “non-marketable”.

(vi) Support for coronavirus related research and development (R&D) to address the current health crisis in the form of direct grants, repayable advances or tax advantages. A bonus may be granted for cross-border cooperation projects between Member States.

(vii) Support for the construction and upscaling of testing facilities to develop and test products (including vaccines, ventilators and protective clothing) useful to tackle the coronavirus outbreak, up to first industrial deployment. This can take the form of direct grants, tax advantages, repayable advances and no-loss guarantees. Companies may benefit from a bonus when their investment is supported by more than one Member State and when the investment is concluded within two months after the granting of the aid.

(viii) Support for the production of products relevant to tackle the coronavirus outbreak in the form of direct grants, tax advantages, repayable advances and no-loss guarantees. Companies may benefit from a bonus when their investment is supported by more than one Member State and when the investment is concluded within two months after the granting of the aid.

(ix) Targeted support in the form of deferral of tax payments and/or suspensions of social security contributions for those sectors, regions or for types of companies that are hit the hardest by the outbreak.

(x) Targeted support in the form of wage subsidies for employees for those companies in sectors or regions that have suffered most from the coronavirus outbreak, and would otherwise have had to lay off personnel.

(xi) Targeted recapitalisation aid to non-financial companies, if no other appropriate solution is available. Safeguards are in place to avoid undue distortions of competition in the Single Market: conditions on the necessity, appropriateness and size of intervention; conditions on the State’s entry in the capital of companies and remuneration; conditions regarding the exit of the State from the capital of the companies concerned; conditions regarding governance including dividend ban and remuneration caps for senior management; prohibition of cross-subsidisation and acquisition ban and additional measures to limit competition distortions; transparency and reporting requirements.

(xii) Support for uncovered fixed costs for companies facing a decline in turnover during the eligible period of at least 30% compared to the same period of 2019 in the context of the coronavirus outbreak. The support will contribute to a part of the beneficiaries’ fixed costs that are not covered by their revenues, up to a maximum amount of €10 million per undertaking.

The Commission will also enable Member States to convert until 31 December 2022 repayable instruments (e.g. guarantees, loans, repayable advances) granted under the Temporary Framework into other forms of aid, such as direct grants, provided the conditions of the Temporary Framework are met.

The Temporary Framework enables Member States to combine all support measures with each other, except for loans and guarantees for the same loan and exceeding the thresholds foreseen by the Temporary Framework. It also enables Member States to combine all support measures granted under the Temporary Framework with existing possibilities to grant de minimis to a company of up to €25,000 over three fiscal years for companies active in the primary agricultural sector, €30,000 over three fiscal years for companies active in the fishery and aquaculture sector and €200,000 over three fiscal years for companies active in all other sectors. At the same time, Member States have to commit to avoid undue cumulation of support measures for the same companies to limit support to meet their actual needs.

Furthermore, the Temporary Framework complements the many other possibilities already available to Member States to mitigate the socio-economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak, in line with EU State aid rules. On 13 March 2020, the Commission adopted a Communication on a Coordinated economic response to the COVID-19 outbreak setting out these possibilities. For example, Member States can make generally applicable changes in favour of businesses (e.g. deferring taxes, or subsidising short-time work across all sectors), which fall outside State Aid rules. They can also grant compensation to companies for damage suffered due to and directly caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

The Temporary Framework will be in place until the end of December 2021. With a view to ensuring legal certainty, the Commission will assess before this date if it needs to be extended.

The non-confidential version of the decision will be made available under the case number SA.62471 in the State aid register on the Commission’s competition website once any confidentiality issues have been resolved. New publications of State aid decisions on the internet and in the Official Journal are listed in the Competition Weekly e-News

More information on the Temporary Framework and other action the Commission has taken to address the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic can be found here.

the sting Milestones

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Millions in Idlib ‘counting on your support to make the violence stop’, UN relief chief tells Security Council

Fresh airstrikes kill dozens in conflict-ravaged Syria

It is now the era to evolve mutually as the bacteria do

“America first” policy goes against EU-US partnership, say MEPs

Driving structural change through global value chains integration

The staggering loss of the Arctic Ocean’s oldest sea ice shown in time-lapse

Milk, fruits and vegetables distributed to schoolchildren thanks to EU programme

6 of the world’s 10 most polluted cities are in India

Commission approves emergency measures to protect eastern Baltic cod

Commission introduces surveillance of imports of bioethanol, and remains open to examining requests from other sectors

Coronavirus: Commission proposes a Digital Green Certificate

EU summit: step up work for recovery, and update migration and asylum system

Commission: Raising the social issues that can make or break the monetary union

UN chief calls for ‘united front’ against anti-Semitism after US synagogue mass-shooting

Mental Health: In Times of COVID-19

A machine din

Human rights defenders, too often left defenceless themselves – UN expert

Better ID card security to curb document fraud

Afghanistan: top UN official denounces ‘extreme’ suffering of civilians in Ghazni

MEPs want to ensure sufficient funding for Connecting Europe’s future

Retirees will outlive their savings by a decade

“We have to do a better job of creating alternatives to violent extremism”, US Secretary of State John Kerry from Switzerland; the Sting reports live from World Economic Forum 2015 in Davos

Mind the (gender) gap: why we should stand together on inclusion

Strong EU trade enforcement rules enter into force

Coronavirus COVID-19 wipes $50 billion off global exports in February alone, as IMF pledges support for vulnerable nations

These are the countries with the highest inflation

Why #Wherearethewomen? is an $11 trillion question

How Leonardo da Vinci’s outsider status made him a Renaissance man

Sustainable finance: Commission publishes guidelines to improve how firms report climate-related information and welcomes three new important reports on climate finance by leading experts

Natural climate solutions can help businesses meet climate goals. Here’s how

EP committees recommend giving consent to EU-UK agreement

From coca to cocoa: three lessons from Peru on how farmers can leave the drug trade behind

Norway’s electric car market has overtaken traditional vehicle sales

Finnish Council Presidency priorities debated in plenary

European Commission launches infringement proceedings against the UK following its failure to name a candidate for EU Commissioner

Google and Apple suddenly realise that doing business in EU is tough?

Tomorrow’s UK general election: Will Tories win majority to shoot an abrupt Brexit or a hung parliament will prolong January’s exit to 2050?

Myanmar: Conflict resolution at ‘total standstill’, military commanders must answer for crimes against humanity

How China became EU’s biggest trading partner and why Brussels should maintain that by all means

EU to relocate 40,000 migrants across the bloc: first step of a long due substantial reform?

European Globalisation Adjustment Fund, who gets it and who pays the bill?

Mobility package: Parliament adopts position on overhaul of road transport rules

OECD warns global economy remains weak as subdued trade drags down growth

New UN forestry project bids to help countries meet climate change commitments

The London City-EU connection holds despite of Brexit and the ban of LSE-Deutsche Börse merger

Women’s rights and how medical students can act as aides of progressive change

5 things we get wrong about young people, according to a US study

New skills agenda for Europe needs real investment

‘Everything is still to be agreed’: informal talks between Parliament and Council on Rule of law conditionality continue

Trade barriers: EU removes record number in response to surge in protectionism

5 reasons why the role of WTO Director-General matters

Jellyfish are taking over the world – and climate change could be to blame

Mergers: Commission clears Telia’s acquisition of Bonnier Broadcasting, subject to conditions

Tuesday’s Daily Brief: UNESCO ready to help after Notre Dame fire, and updates on Libya, Nicaragua, and the Cyclone Idai response

Measles claims more than twice as many lives than Ebola in DR Congo

5 neuroscience hacks that will make you happier

Here are 3 ways venture capital can fund a better future

These five exercise trends will help society and your health

Will AI make the gender gap in the workplace harder to close?

COVID-19: EU must step up efforts to tackle medicine shortages

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s