Strawberries and child support; a Thai partnership

© UNICEF/Metee Thuentap Three-month-old Monluck Saesong is among 128,000 children in Thailand who benefit from a UNICEF-promoted child support grant. (file 2016)

This article is brought to you in association with the United Nations.


Mother of three, Mhee Saesong, a strawberry farmer from Chiang Mai in the north of Thailand, has always struggled alongside her husband to provide for her family. She describes how, in the past, when her two older children became sick, she was unable to afford to take them to hospital.

But that changed following the birth of her third child, Monluck, and the introduction of a nationwide child support grant worth just under US$20 per month. “I was so happy when I heard this news,” Mhee says. “Before, I didn’t have money to take my children to see doctors.”

The grant, for which 117,000 children from low-income families have been registered, was introduced by the Thai government following advocacy carried out by the UN Children’s Fund, UNICEF.

Read more here about how vulnerable families in Thailand are benefitting from child support payments.

The ‘core’ of the Sustainable Development Goals

It is an example of the type of partnerships that United Nations agencies are building with governments as part of a global push to realize the 17 sustainable development goals of the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which aims to eradicate poverty, and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity while protecting the planet.

“Partnerships are at the core of the sustainable development goals,” said Deidre Boyd, the United Nations Resident Coordinator in Thailand, the UN’s most senior official in the country. “The goals are so ambitious, that it is clear everyone has to be involved.”

In Thailand, an upper middle-income country which “has dealt with many of the major issues of poverty and access to health services,” Ms Boyd said, “our role as the UN is to really strengthen the partnerships with people and organizations in Thailand to achieve the SDGs.”

5 things you need to know about Partnerships for the Sustainable Development Goals

What are they, and why are they needed?

In 2015, world leaders adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that aims to end poverty, tackle inequalities and combat climate change. Governments, civil society, scientists, academia and the private sector need to come together to achieve the sustainable development goals and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 17 looks at how best that can be achieved.

While most of the goals focus on specific sectors, for example, health, hunger, decent work, climate and many more, SDG 17 reflects a holistic approach to implementing for the 2030 Agenda. It cuts across all the other goals and includes 19 targets that span finance, technology, capacity-building, trade and systemic issues, which focus on policy and institutional coherence.

That sounds ambitious?

It is, and the UN has said that the world should be doing better. “Despite some advances in certain areas in 2017, more needs to be done to accelerate progress. All stakeholders will have to intensify and focus their efforts on the areas where progress has been slow,” the UN Secretary-General António Guterres wrote in a recent report

The UN has also emphasized that countries should focus on partnership efforts that support the SDGs and which help to fill existing gaps in SDG implementation, be it ensuring that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education, or that all forms of discrimination against all women and girls are ended.

So, what does this mean in practice?

It means a lot of work going on behind the scenes, which, while not necessarily headline-grabbing, could have a profound effect on positive progress towards the goals. For example, measures to improve the capacity of national governments for tax and other revenue collection means those governments should have more money to spend on providing basic services like health and education. Partnerships to boost communications technology should result in more people in developing countries getting access to the internet. And working to “significantly increase the exports of developing countries, in particular with a view to doubling the least developed countries’ share of global exports by 2020”, as the goal explains, should bring more prosperity to some of the world’s poorest countries. ”

The sharing of expertise and knowledge, including data, is also highlighted in SDG 17. In June 2019, the United Nations specialized agency for information and communication technologies, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), launched a partnership to collect and provide data on electronic waste (for example, discarded television sets, mobile phones and computers and end-of-life batteries) which it describes as “the fastest growing part of the world’s domestic waste stream.” The idea is to use the data to help track progress towards global e-waste legislation and recycling goals.

 

How does this impact individuals?

The UN believes, “we are all in this together”, and that “change begins with you”, and encourages individuals to get involved in the SDGs generally by making small changes to their lifestyles, for example turning off lights to save electricity. On a partnerships level it suggests engaging, or partnering, with local and national authorities to participate in initiatives that don’t harm people or the planet.

And the UN suggests mentoring young people at work, adding that “it’s a thoughtful, inspiring and a powerful way to guide someone towards a better future.” The UN has even produced a guide showing how “lazy people” can get involved.

Aren’t partnerships already happening?

Yes, the United Nations has always worked in partnership with national governments, development partners, civil society, and the corporate world, as well as individuals, and SDG 17 is all about strengthening those partnerships and making sure they are more productive in terms of reaching the ambitious targets set out in the 16 other goals.

What is SDG 17?

Sustainable development goal 17 seeks to strengthen global partnerships to support and achieve the ambitious targets of the 2030 Agenda, bringing together national governments, the international community, civil society, the private sector and other actors.

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Pharmaceuticals conceal drug side effects with the EU’s Court blessing

Guterres censures terrorist attacks in Nigeria, pledges UN ‘solidarity’

This fascinating map shows how food moves around the US

Burning Amazon rainforests: Darting towards the doom of Human Race

Laws must protect, ‘not reject’ says UNAIDS chief on Zero Discrimination Day

What we know about the Wuhan coronavirus and urgent plans to develop a vaccine

Why are the Balkans’ political leaders meeting in Geneva this week?

State aid: Commission approves €300 million public support for the development of ultrafast broadband network in Greece

Brexit: Is there anybody supporting a non-violent separation?

Business can be profitable AND drive progress on societal priorities

This tool shows you which cities will flood as ice sheets melt

We must work together to build a new world order. This is how we can do it

Commission supports normalisation in Greece through activation of post-programme framework

Brands can be a force for good and for growth. Here’s how

These are the fastest trains in the world

COVID-19: Commission presents guidelines for border measures to protect health and keep goods and essential services available

No end to Deutsche Bank’s problems: new litigations in the US and frailty in EU stress test

SMEs are driving job growth, but need higher investment in skills, innovation and tech to boost wages and productivity

Darfur: Inter-communal tensions still high despite improved security, Mission head tells Security Council

This is how travel hotspots are fighting back against overtourism

Draghi reveals how failing banks will be dealt, may cut interest rates soon

European Solidarity Corps: Commission opens new call for project proposals

Will GDPR block Blockchain?

The latest technology isn’t enough – you need the business model to go with it

Busting the myths about coronavirus

IMF’s Lagarde: Ukraine must fight corruption

When is necessary understand the cultural marks in health-disease process

Coronavirus update: UN scales back major conference

Coronavirus: Macro-financial assistance agreement provides for €80 million disbursement to North Macedonia

A Sting Exclusive: “Consumer expectations for the 2015 UN summit on climate change”, Director General of BEUC Monique Goyens outlines from Brussels

Ensuring the ‘lungs of the planet’ keep us alive: 5 things you need to know about forests and the UN

Parliament cuts own spending to facilitate agreement on EU budget

8 amazing facts to help you understand China today

Secretary-General repeats call for support to Lake Chad countries after latest Boko Haram attack

Progress made at COP25, despite lack of agreement to increase climate ambition

French Prime Minister passes Stability Program and takes his ‘café’ in Brussels this June

90% of European Jews say antisemitism is getting worse

Code of Practice against disinformation: Commission calls on signatories to intensify their efforts

World-famous cultural institutions closed due to coronavirus are welcoming virtual visitors

In this Tokyo cafe, the waiters are robots operated remotely by people with disabilities

The inhumane face of crisis mirrored in numbers

Ukraine: The West and Russia negotiate shares of influence

Barriers to healthcare: are they real?

Malta and Slovakia: MEPs warn of lack of judicial independence and corruption

After John Lewis: 21 civil rights leaders who are shaping America

Impact Investment needs global standards and better measurement

These Harvard scientists think we’ll have to socially distance until 2022

Croatian Presidency outlines priorities to EP committees

The world is too complacent about epidemics. Here’s how to change

Rise in number of children killed, maimed and recruited in conflict: UN report

Capital Markets Union: Making it easier for insurers to invest in the real economy

Commission reports on the risks of investor citizenship and residence schemes in the EU and outlines steps to address them

Women’s rights face global pushback from conservativism, fundamentalism – UN experts warn

A clean energy future with hydrogen could be closer than we think

EU budget: Will Germany alone manage Britain’s gap?

How technology will transform learning in the COVID-19 era

After COVID-19, we must rethink how we find and produce new drugs

EU-Turkey deal on migrants kicked off but to who’s interest?

A revolution, an ecosystem, an ocean: 5G is just the beginning

More Stings?

Advertising

Trackbacks

  1. […] Strawberries and child support; a Thai partnership The European Sting […]

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s