Changing for the change: Medicine in Industry 4.0

Industry 4 World Economic Forum

(World Economic Forum. 2017)

This article was exclusively written for the Sting by Ms Maria Khan. The writer is a student of third year MBBS at Army medical college and a proud member of AMSA and IFMSA-Pakistan for the past three years. She is also affiliated to the International Federation of Medical Students Associations (IFMSA). However, the opinions expressed in this piece belong strictly to the writer and do not necessarily reflect IFMSA’s view on the topic, nor The European Sting’s one.

“Industrie 4.0” or the fourth industrial revolution originated from a project of the German government based on interoperability, information transparency, technical assistance and decentralized decisions. After the previous revolutions involving use of steam power, electricity; digital technology and computing, now is the era of cyber physical systems, driverless cars, smart robotics and manufacturing processes built around 3D printing.

The World Economic Forum says more than 7 million jobs are at risk from advances in technology in the world’s largest economies over the next five years. On one estimate, 47% of US jobs are at risk from automation. According to a study conducted by Oxford University and Deltoitte, 850,000 UK public sector jobs could be automated by 2030.

Jobs like teachers, social workers and police officers face a 23% chance of automation. In the health service, the number of staff in the nursing field is expected to fall from 274,000 in 2015 to 266,000 by 2030. The group of Healthcare practice managers shall minimize from 10,000 in 2015 to 2000 by 2030. According to Niall Ferguson, Professor of Financial and Economic History at Harvard University, the only difference between the current and previous revolutions is its exponential rather than linear pace.

Technological change has always been disruptive in one way or another. We are in a midst of industrial revolution where smart machines will soon replace workers; invention of more powerful gadgets and mobile devices with unlimited power, storage and access to knowledge; accompanied by significant and mind blowing innovations in biotechnology, robotics, 3D printing, nanotechnology, genetic engineering and quantum physics. The pace at which this change is proceeding is extremely fast and will encompass all that we know.

We have been told from the very start that a doctor needs to master some basic skills including professionalism, basic ethics like doctor-patient confidentiality, being empathetic, attentive and progressive (forward thinking), maintaining a positive and generous attitude. This was good enough uptill now.

In order to benefit from changes of the revolution, we all need to change, we all need to prepare including health workers as well. Robots and gadgets may be faster, giving accurate lab results and diagnostic values but they cannot beat us in critical thinking, people management, emotional intelligence, service orientation and judgment and decision making.

The medicine industry is changing all the time. Also people always need healthcare, no matter what time or day of the year, they need medical attention. People can’t rely completely on apps and technology. Research has shown that doctors who have established a genuine empathetic connection, their patients actually experience a reduction in pain and shall likely recover faster.

Another point to ponder is the significance of the “Trust factor”. Klaus Schwab, Founder and executive of the World Economic Forum says “The biggest global issue is the continued erosion of trust”. This applies best to the patient-technology status. People might sometimes use medical apps for knowing the uses and side effects of medicines and finding the likely differential diagnosis, but ultimately they would end up with the doctors for their checkup because they are unlikely to risk their health to technology.

About the writer

Maria Khan is currently a student of third year MBBS at Army medical college and a proud member of AMSA and IFMSA-Pakistan for the past three years. She has an experience in publishing for the past five years and published her articles in DAWN. She is the member of the college research society AURF and has had the chance to present my research at the 11th annual AURF symposium and the 1st SG International conference being the youngest of all speakers. Her special interests include research in hematology, oncology and pediatrics, reading and writing articles.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Featured Stings

EU agricultural production no more a self-sufficiency anchor

Time to be welcome: Youth work and integration of young refugees

EU rewards organisations that make eco-innovation pay

Education expenditure in the EU not hurt much by crisis

COP21 Business update: Companies urge now for carbon pricing as coal is still a big issue

In China things are moving in the right direction

Ukraine-EU deal sees the light but there’s no defeat for Russia

Unemployment and stagnation can tear Eurozone apart if austere policies persist

“Will TTIP solve the massive EU-US unemployment? Absolutely not!” A revealing Sting Exclusive with Tim Bennett from the Transatlantic Business Council

Italy’s dilemma after Merkel-Hollande agreed loose banking union

New skills needed for medical students in Industry 4.0

Is Erdogan losing game and match within and without Turkey?

The European Commission to stop Buffering

The EU Consumer Policy on the Digital Market: A Behavioral Economics View

EU Commission expects consumer spending to unlock growth

The Commission tries to stop the ‘party’ with the structural funds

Why are the financial markets shivering again?

The EU Parliament blasts the Council about the tax dealings of the wealthy

Mobile 360 Africa 11-13 July 2017

A money laundering case on Vatican Bank’s road to renovation

Entrepreneurship in a newly shaped Europe: what is the survival kit for a young Catalan and British entrepreneur in 2018?

India’s Largest Entrepreneurship Event is Back! (23-24th August 2016)

A Sting Exclusive: Paris Climate Change Summit, a defining moment for humanity, by Ulf Björnholm Head of UNEP Brussels

Industrial products: Lifting the last impediments in the EU single market

Finance for SMEs: Alternative supply mechanisms do exist

EU Parliament semi worried over democratic deficit

Pro-EU forces won a 70% triumph in the European elections

Italy’s Letta: A European Banking Union soon or Eurozone collapses

ECB asks for more subsidies to banks

Europe’s top court hears Intel and sends € 1.06 bn antitrust fine to review

Theresa May’s global Britain against Philip Hammond’s Brexit fog

What lessons to draw from the destruction of Syria

A sterilised EMU may lead to a break up of Eurozone

Lack of involvement, or lack of opportunities?

Is South Korea set to lose from its FTA with the EU?

European Commission determined to conclude EU-Mercosur trade deal this year despite French concerns

Why Eurozone’s problems may end in a few months

The EU Parliament unanimously rejects Commission’s ideas about ‘seeds’

“As German Chancellor I want to be able to cope with the merger of the real and digital economy”, Angela Merkel from Switzerland; the Sting reports live from World Economic Forum 2015 in Davos

“Beating pollution for our planet”, a Sting Exclusive by Mr Erik Solheim, the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment

COP21 Breaking News_09 December: The Draft Agreement Updated

The inhumane face of crisis mirrored in numbers

How the Irish people were robbed by banks, the Commission and their own government

The DNA of the future retail CEO

Travel the world, find yourself

Bank resolutions to remain a politically influenced affair

Mental health in medical students: the deciphered quandary

The Peoples are missing from EU’s monetary union

Can Kiev make face to mounting economic problems and social unrest?

The European Commission cuts roaming charges. But “it’s not enough”…

Chinese economy to raise speed and help the world grow

The Irish Presidency bullies the Parliament over EU budget

G20 LIVE: “International communities and leaders have great expectations for 2016 G20 summit in Hangzhou China”, Mr Wang Xiaolong, the Chinese Foreign Ministry’s special envoy stresses live from G20 in Antalya Turkey

EU Parliament says ‘no’ to austerity budget

ZTE @ MWC14: ZTE excels in all areas at this year’s Mobile World Congress

Why Commissioner Rehn wants us all to work more for less

Counting unemployment in the EU: The real rate comes to anything between 16.1% and 20.6%

EU and Japan agree on free-trade deal and fill the post-TPP void

Can the EU afford to block China’s business openings to Europe by denying her the ‘market economy status’?

A shortened EU Summit admits failures, makes risky promises

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s