Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson: who forced the two ‘brave’ Brexiteers to quit?

Nigel Farage Referendum 2016

Nigel Farage at the European Parliament. Event Date: 28/06/2016 Extraordinary Plenary session – Vote of a resolution analysing the outcome and ways forward Reference: EP-038833A Copyright: © European Union 2016 – Source : EP.

There is hardly anyone who has something between the ears that can deny the unecessary trouble Britain has put itself into following the Brexit vote of June 23rd. A couple of weeks following the apocalyptic referendum the world has witnessed anything from a historic plunge of the pound to panic in the world markets and Brussels demanding a fast Brexit and a simple trade deal with the UK.

In addition, we also witnessed the resignation of the British Premier David Cameron. This was much anticipated though and probably the most decent thing one would expect from a man who back in 2013 gambled the mere prosperity of his country to get re-elected and finally drove Albion right to the edge of the cliff, and perhaps a step farther than that.

The clown parade

At the same time, only days after the pompous statements of victory by the Brexit camp leaders that UK is finally free and ready to shape the country’s own fate against the unelected bureaucrats of Brussels, the tower of sand suddenly collapsed. The first slap in the face of the 17 million Brexit voters was given by the caricature former London Mayor and furious Brexit propagandist, Boris Johnson. This politician who was anticipated by all bookies to be Britain’s next Prime Minister as the Tory major personality who won the EU referendum, instead of launching a victorious campaign ahead of the Conservative Party Conference next October, suddenly decided to step down from the race last Thursday. How is it possible that a too ambitious politician wins the race but doesn’t remain at his seat to lift trophy and become Prime Minister?

Some critics rushed to call him “rubbish”, “coward” or “incompetent” and a complete “disappointment” to some of the 17 million people who were convinced by his sirens that UK is better off isolated and tiny. Overall, last Thursday’s resignation of Boris Johnson has been largely incomprehensible and completely irrational; until yesterday. Only 24 hours ago the number two personality of the Brexit camp, UKIP’s leader Nigel Farage, did follow “BoJo’s” example by stepping down as the nationalist party’s leader. This man, wearing exactly the same suit and tie as on the morrow of the referendum when he was celebrating his victory with Big Ben on the background, just announced another ‘irrational’ resignation. How is it possible that the founder of UKIP, the man who has been propagating for 20 years now in favour of Brexit, wins the referendum but doesn’t remain at his seat to increase further his power in the next general elections and possibly govern?

The real reason behind the resignations

It seems that nowadays the UK is an absurd political space where both winners and losers resign to save their lives from the Kraken of Brexit. Insanity and reason have become one and very few political analysts in this world are now able to explain Johnson’s and Farage’s resignations. Nobody could ever expect that those sworn career politicians will ever let go after their ‘great’ win; nobody except for their bosses.

The only explanation that remains then is that these two politicians never intended to govern or become prime ministers or anything like that. For one thing, Nigel Farage at the night of the counting of the votes rushed to humiliate himself by speaking on BBC around midnight thanking his voters for their support and already acknowledging his defeat, super convinced by the most recent YouGov 22.00 poll that estimated a marginal win for Remain. The truth is that neither Farage nor Johnson believed for one moment that they could win the referendum. Those “project managers” were just doing their job all this time, challenging Cameron and capitalising on British euroscepticism and exceptionalism to destabilise Great Britain and the European Union too.

Let’s not embrace too easily the critics of Farage and Johnson who call them “hypocrites, cowards, imposters, liars, rats“ etc. It might as well be that those two gentlemen were just commissioned to deliver one single job in the first place: bring the Brexit vote as close as possible to the Remain one. Since both of them though are overachievers they managed to walk the extra mile and lead the Brexit camp to an unexpected victory. However, the contracts of both BoJo and Farage expired on 23 June, hence it was high time to cash out and resign. There was never any ambition from them to respect the Brexit voter and lead him all the way to a new fair deal with the EU. There was never any ideology or political ambition. Instead, these two men were contractual short-term agents, commissioned to deliver a job, dismantle the UK.

And now the 17 million Brexiteers

Now that some light has been cast on the ‘mystery’ of two peculiar resignations shaking Britain in the last few days, let’s go down to the biggest mystery of man kind, which is none other than the voting behaviour of 17 million UK citizens who did listen to two “project managers”. One good cause of that is certainly the terrible leading skills of Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour party since last year. This man’s world renowned poor leadership skills and limited talent have pushed a big part of the traditional Labour voters to tick Leave in the polling stations on 23 June, allured by the abysmal propaganda based on lies and authored by two project managers, Farage and Johnson. Comrade Corbyn has seen all the major MPs of his party resign and still one week later remains in power, totally unwilling to let go, beyond any logic whatsoever. Consequently, Mr Corbyn has officially become now a plague for the British Labour party and the Labour movements in Europe overall as he gambles the mere fate of his party just because he enjoys the privileges of his position. Some strange times we live in Europe these days when even classic ideologists prefer money to ideas.

Let’s go back now to the voting behaviour of the “proud” Brexiteers who trusted two project managers, Farage and BoJo. Leaving all the traditional and hard core eurosceptics in the UK aside, this referendum was won, or lost as many would argue about its result, while a large amount of the EU referendum voters did not even know what the EU is or stands for, as proved in the analysis following the referendum. Ignorance is certainly an important factor that led to Brexit on 23 June.

Moreover, how many of those 17 million voters did hit the like button on Rihanna’s or Rita Ora’s latest semi-naked photo on Facebook, who both attract millions of likes from around the world for no reason whatsoever? How many of those 17 million voters did hit the like button on Farage’s “Nazi” campaign poster on Facebook with migrants fleeing to UK, without even realising what they were actually doing?

The result of the EU referendum shows that the answer to the above questions sadly is: too many.

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