EU: Turkey to shelter Syrian refugees and turn other immigrants back in return of €3 billion

The EU heads of state or government met with the Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (in the middle) in the European Council of 29 November. After the meeting Donald Tusk, President of the European Council (first from left), Davutoglu and Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission held a Press conference. (Shoot location: Brussels – Belgium. Shoot date: 29/11/2015. Copyright credit 'The European Union').

The EU heads of state or government met with the Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (in the middle) in the European Council of 29 November. After the meeting Donald Tusk, President of the European Council (first from left), Davutoglu and Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission held a Press conference. (Shoot location: Brussels – Belgium. Shoot date: 29/11/2015. Copyright credit ‘The European Union’).

A genuine Turkish bazaar took place last Sunday in Brussels during the meeting of the EU heads of state or government with the Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu. The horse-trading was about what it will cost the EU to stem of the flow of immigrants who pass through Turkey on their way to Europe. Finally the price was set at €3 billion, for a round number of two million Syrian refugees to be accommodated or rather held, sheltered and fed in Turkey. However, nobody seemed happy with the outcome of the negotiations.

Davutoglu observed that the €3bn will go to the Syrian refugees not to Turkey and preferred to put the emphasis of the agreement to “a historic re-energizing of the Turkish EU accession talks “. Francois Hollande the French President had a completely different story to tell about the agreement with Turkey. While prematurely leaving the meeting, in relation to the Turkish EU accession talks he said “nothing has changed, there is no reason to accelerate or delay it”.

Hollande focuses on refugees

Hollande also emphasized the obligations of Ankara to close its borders with Syria and contribute to a viable political solution in this country. This was a direct hint that Turkey should stop rejecting the role the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad can play in a post civil war arragnment. Undoubtedly, the French President was adamant that the subject of the EU-Turkey meeting was the refugee problem and its repercussions. Obviously France, especially after the downing of the Russian war airplane by the Turks, doesn’t want to be seen as discussing an upgrade of the EU-Turkish relations. Lately, Moscow is quite choleric about whatever is related to Turkey and Europe knows it has to respect that.

Donald Tusk, the President of the European Council, speaking at the Press conference after the meeting, was not as clear as Hollande vis-à-vis Turkey. When summarizing the results of the negotiations, Tusk said “with today’s decision both sides committed to step up the tempo of the accession talks with the view to make progress but the benchmarks and the standards will remain the same”. Understandably, Tusk had to be more placating than Hollande with Turkey, because there were other EU member states, like Britain pressing hard for an acceleration of the Turkish EU accession talks.
Others think differently

It’s interesting though to further analyze what Tusk exactly said and when he said it. His final words at the very end of the Press conference were “…but the benchmarks and the standards will remain the same”. In this way, he reminded Davutoglu that all the Brussels reserves in relation to the Turkish EU accession talks are always there. No need to remind the reader, that Brussels is quite irritated with the downing of the Russian plane and the latest arrests of two prominent Turkish journalists. The Europeans clearly detest the overall undemocratic or even autocratic way the country is ruled by President Recep Tayip Erdogan.

Despite being a constitutionally non partisan head of state, Erdogan regularly oversteps his lawful role and actually rules the country as a party leader, which he is not any more. His war against the Kurds and his strategy to silence all vocal opposition, using the country’s police and judiciary structures quite arbitrarily, makes him an awkward interlocutor to Europe. That’s why the EU leaders, probably at the exception of the British premier David Cameron, do not want to be seen as yielding to his demands.

A difficult equation

Given all that Tusk had a very difficult task in conciliating the diverging European positions vis-à-vis Turkey. He knew that Brussels needs Turkey to stop the immigrant flows before crossing the borders of Europe. That’s why he emphasized that “Our agreement sets out a clear plan for the timely re-establishment of order at our shared frontier”. In short, Tusk asked Turkey to stop directing the refugee flows to the Greek borders in the Aegean islands and added that Europe is ready to pay €3bn for that.

It remains to be seen if Turkey will deliver her part of the deal and arrest the flow of refugees and immigrants coming through its Syrian borders, keep those who finally reach her soil there, and prevent them from travelling to Europe. The €3bn is meant to cover the cost of offering shelter to Syrian refugees and turn the other immigrants back. For most of the EU countries this is the meaning of EU-Turkey agreement signed last Sunday. Tusk had an obligation, mainly towards France, to also confirm that and to this effect he noted that the meeting was about creating in Turkey “a new Syrian Refugee Facility of €3 billion” and “stem the migration flow that is coming to the EU via Turkey”.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Featured Stings

Bank resolutions to remain a politically influenced affair

ECB intervenes to clean May’s and Schäuble’s mess

Young students envision turning Europe into an Entrepreneurial Society

No better year for the EU’s weak chain links

ECB settles the bank resolution issue, makes banking union tangible

“Austerity was not the alternative!”, President Hannes Swoboda of the European Socialists and Democrats on another Sting Exclusive

How the Irish people were robbed by banks, the Commission and their own government

“China is the only BRICS country to have either met or possibly slightly surpassed my expectations”, BRICS inventor Jim O’ Neil from Switzerland; the Sting reports live from World Economic Forum 2015 in Davos

Alice in Colombia

Oh, well, you are wrong, Google responds to the European Commission

Yanukovych attempts a violent and deadly cleansing of Kiev’s center

Is the EU denying its social character favouring a banking conglomerate?

Eurozone: Retail sales betray economic frailty

A Sting Exclusive: “China is Making Good Stories not Bad Ones”, Ambassador Yang highlights from Brussels

It’s not summer holidays what lead to the bad August of the German economy

ECB offers cheaper money despite reactions from Germany

A Sting Exclusive, the European Commissioner for Energy Günther Oettinger writes for the Sting on “EU Industry: a major energizer”

How did Facebook fool the Commission that easily during the WhatsApp acquisition?

The 28 EU leaders don’t touch the thorny issues

Italy’s rescue operation Mare Nostrum shuts down with no real replacement. EU’s Triton instead might put lives at risk

The EU seals CETA but plans to re-baptise TTIP after missing the 2016 deadline

WEF Davos 2016 LIVE: “You just don’t know if the oil price will be 20$ or 100$ in the next 2-3 years!” top Harvard economist Kenneth Rogoff underscores from Davos

A new proposal breaks the stalemate over the Banking Union

Brussels waits for the Germans to arrive

Exchanges of medical students and the true understanding of global health issues

Warmongers ready to chew what is left of social protection spending

Has Germany rebuffed ECB on the banking union?

Who really cares about the 26.2 million of EU jobless?

EU to pay a dear price if the next crisis catches Eurozone stagnant and deflationary; dire statistics from Eurostat

168 hours left for MEPs – ECOFIN Council to deliver a Banking Union

The consequences of Brexit seen by a European young entrepreneur

MWC 2016 Live: Roshan CEO opens up on Afghanistan challenges

Deutsche Bank again in the middle of the US-EU economic skirmishes

MWC 2016 LIVE: Intel focuses on 5G “beyond the Powerpoint”

Global Citizen-Volunteer Internships

The umpteenth Italian overturn takes Renzi and PD to unprecedented victory at EU elections

EU-US relations on the dawn of the Trump era

Parliament asks for the termination of EU-US bank data deal

A sterilised EMU may lead to a break up of Eurozone

Christmas spending: Who can afford not to cut?

The Social Committee may accept the new ‘contractual’ Eurozone

Germany to help China in trade disputes with Brussels

Will ECB win against low inflation by not following Quantitave Easing?

South Eurozone countries threatened by rising borrowing cost and expensive euro

Lithuania finds the ways to maintain its energy security

EU to fail 2050 Green targets due to lack of European citizens’ engagement

EU’s new environmental policy on biofuels impacts both the environment and the European citizen

To my Chinese friend

Community Manager – 1289

The strong version of the EU banking union gains momentum

How Germany strives to mold ECB’s monetary policy to her interests

A day in the life of a Venezuelan migrant in Boa Vista, Brazil

Schaeuble wants IMF out and bailouts ‘a la carte’ with Germany only to gain

EU-Russia relations: the beginning of a warmer winter?

EU Commission closer to imposing anti-dumping duties on Chinese solar panel imports?

Paris agreed with Berlin over a loose and ineffective banking union

Banks, insurance giants are free again to abuse the real economy

Commission deepens criticism on German economic policies

Commission facilitates the activities of ‘merchants of labour’

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s