Greferendum: the biggest political gaffe in western modern history to tear Europe apart? #Grexit #Graccident

The man who tried to blow up Greece and Europe in 2015 so that he and his comrades stay in power. Mr Alexis Tsipras, the Greek Prime Minister, launched the historic referendum in Greece on 27 June 2015 (CouncilTVNewsroom, 25/06/2015)

The man who tried to blow up Greece and the entire edifice of Europe in 2015 so that he and his comrades stay in power. Mr Alexis Tsipras, the Greek Prime Minister, launched the historic referendum in Greece, the second in the modern history of the nation, on 27 June 2015 (CouncilTVNewsroom, 25/06/2015)

Once upon a time there was a beautiful historical country that used to be part of the European Union. It became the 10th country to join the block in 1981 and was evolved ever since to become a pole of stability and growth in the Balkan region and serve crucial geo-strategic interests in the Mediterranean. The introduction in the chapter of Greece in the history books about Europe in 50 years from now could be similar. What would be difficult to foresee are the words the historian of the future will refer to the clumsiest political mistake that irrevocably and suddenly showed in 2015 Greece the way out of Eurozone and possibly of the block.

Greek crisis

The Greek financial and debt crisis has been in the spotlight of the world for quite some time now. We have been monitoring very closely the gradual escalation and deterioration of the negotiations of the European Union with the newly elected leftist government. There is always something to say before and after every Eurogroup and EU Summit while at the same time the bomb is ticking fast towards the final deadline of the 30th of June, when the Greek bailout programme expires and the country enters a real financial limbo. Last week there were some good positive signs of a final agreement to be reached. Nevertheless, this newspaper had predicted that the sides will not sign any agreement last week and unfortunately we were right.

Greferendum

While the world was anticipating yesterday’s Eurogroup as the meeting that would finally decide on Greece’s future, the Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras felt like stealing the show. In a unique move in the history of politics in the developed world the youngest premier in the Greek democracy took the microphone a bit after at the early hours of Saturday and he absurdly declared the country in a “state of war”. The fearless Greek political leader basically denounced the proposed agreement with the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the IMF and called the Greek citizens to do his job, to rather cut a deal with the creditors on their own?

However bizarre this might sound, Mr Tsipras totally blew it yesterday, by announcing the #Greferendum; a referendum towards the Greek people, the second in the country’s political history since the 1970s, to be executed in just one week’s time and the question being the following:

“According to relevant decision and suggestion of the council of ministers to the Greek Parliament, after recommendation of the Prime Minister, during the process of the suggested referendum, the Greek people will be called to decide with their vote whether there should be accepted the agreement plan proposed by the European Commission, European Central Bank and the IMF in the Eurogroup of the 25/06/2015 and is composed by two documents which compose the proposition on which the referendum is presented: the first document titled “Reforms of the completion of the Current Program and Beyond” and the second “Preliminary Debt sustainability analysis”.

Those who reject the proposal of the three institutions VOTE NOT ACCEPTED/NO

Those who accept the proposal of the three institutions VOTE ACCEPTED/YES”

Absurdity

Does this sound like a question you think that the average Greek is able to comprehend and vote for/against? If not, do embrace yourselves for what you hear next. Despite the unorthodox nature of the referendum question and its confusing wording for any citizen in this world, it turns out that neither of the two documents referred to are official agreement documents signed by the EU side. Instead, those are extensive documents that were presented by the government to the Greek parliament yesterday and are mainly consisted of draft notes exchanged between the two parties during the long negotiations between the Southern European country and its creditors.

So, the “political ingenuity” of the Greek government currently decided it would be essential that 11,000,000 citizens will have to judge two technical macroeconomic technical documents that they will never be able to see or even so understand. What is more, the “responsible” Prime Minister called the Greek citizen to answer a clear NO and so did his “comrades” in the leftist party of Syriza. They are even planning to campaign around Greece next week to travel and make extra governmental route costs in a country where the gasoline in the tanks of the cars and the groceries at the supermarkets will start running out as of tomorrow.

This is Sparta

It seems that the hardcore leftists envisage that they will be able to reach out their electorate around the country while the ATM s will not be working and anarchy will be ruling. However sick this may sound, the Greek politicians that govern that country in the European south today believe that on top of that the creditors will be “scared” and come back to them with an “easy” proposal instead of stringent austerity. Mr Varoufakis, the non politician and of doubtful political intelligence Finance Minister, underlined during a press conference yesterday that he really “HOPES” the institutions will back off and will present last minute  a new “magic” easy to digest agreement proposal by Tuesday, when the current programme expires.

Sadly for the leftist ultras of Greece, the President of the Eurogroup, Jeroen Dijsselbloem said openly yesterday that it came as a surprise to the debtors that Greece suddenly left from the negotiation table announcing the referendum. He also rejected Greece’s latest request to extend the existing programme for a few weeks, so that the referendum operates smoothly. He seriously warned about the “tough times” that the Greek government will have to manage on its own from Tuesday onwards. Last, he made it clear that Eurozone and the European Central Bank will take all possible measures to defend themselves from an inevitable Greek default.

All this at the same time when the Greek parliament voted in favour of executing of the referendum yesterday with a vote of 178 to 120. To be noted that except the government, the Greek Nazi party, Greek Dawn, also voted in favour, taking the opportunity to benefit from this polarisation of the electorate in order to worryingly increase perhaps their power and rhetoric.

“Hanging” the Greeks

This is clearly the biggest crisis unfolding in Eurozone since its very existence. Greece was among the first members to join and apparently will also be the first to exit it. Eurozone’s weaknesses and EU leaders’s stubbornness towards austerity aside, Greece officially committed suicide yesterday. Following obscene and unreasonable hard core leftist tactics Mr Tsipras literally put the rope around the Greeks’ neck threatening that he will kick the bucket if the elite of Europe does not reconsider austerity.

All in all, history will always remember the brave and the bold. But how far is really braveness from stupidity? In principle the borderline is thin but in this case one could say that it is just not there. Tsipras and his comrades never seize to think even today that by showing bravery and suicidal behaviour, of the level Leonidas showed, they will be able to push the European political elite to reconcile with less fiscal consolidation and structural reforms.

Stopping tanks with flowers

Convincing a Europe that is not run today at all by great inspired political personalities with a concrete vision but by bankers and analysts with thick glasses, who see as far as their pay check at the end of the month, is certainly not a piece of cake. The large inability of the Greek politicians though or anybody else to empathise and understand this new world order makes them inescapably incompetent, naive, dangerous. Tsipras launched yesterday a salto mortale gamble with 11,000,000 lives in the most unprofessional, absurd and irresponsible manner.

He will be judged by history for this political gaffe and Greece will face capital controls, panic and social division next week until the referendum of 06 July, at least. It remains to be seen now whether the bankers that rule Europe have a good plan first to save the rest of Eurozone from contagion and also to show well deserved sympathy for the Greek people.

The Greek drama begins just now.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

the European Sting Milestones

Featured Stings

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Chart of the day: These are the cities where the World Cup threatens productivity the most

Impressions of China

Commission goes less than mid-way on expensive euro

EU elections 2019: Trump’s share in the support of populism

Irish Presidency: Not a euro more for EU budgets

Addressing the consequences of digitalisation in the Russia & CIS region

The Brexit factor in the US-China trade war and other conflicts

EU members commit to build an integrated gas market and finally cut dependency on Russia

Hostages to a rampant banking system

Meet Alice, the battery-powered plane that could herald the age of electric air travel

European elections: A chance to repel both nationalism and no-deal Brexit

Imported and EU fisheries products should be treated equally

Glaringly false reassurances about the repercussions of the EU-US free trade agreement

Will the outcome of the UK referendum “calm” the financial markets?

Scientists in Sweden are studying the climate-cooling effects of spruce forests

In Sweden you can roam anywhere you like, without the landowner’s permission

Dieselgate: Parliament calls for mandatory retrofits of polluting cars

The punishment gap: how workplace mistakes hurt women and minorities most

OECD Donor countries need to reform development finance to meet 2030 pledge

Presentation of Juncker’s Investment Plan: Can 315 billion euros save the EU?

5 steps that could end the plastic pollution crisis – and save our ocean

The refugee crisis seen through the eyes of a young doctor from Turkey

“Will TTIP solve the massive EU-US unemployment? Absolutely not!” A revealing Sting Exclusive with Tim Bennett from the Transatlantic Business Council

This is why people live, work and stay in a growing city

4 bold new ways New York is going clean and green

Statelessness for terrorists’ families, never an acceptable option, urges UN rights chief

‘Historic moment’ for people on the move, as UN agrees first-ever Global Compact on migration

DR Congo: days ahead ‘critical’ to ‘historic election process’ Security Council hears

Ireland’s planning to make its Emerald Isle even greener

Greece: The new government of Alexis Tsipras shows its colors

The influence of the multilateral agreement on migrant health

Here are 10 of Nelson Mandela’s most inspirational quotes

Somalis ‘will not be deterred’ by Friday’s terror attacks – UN chief

Accountability for atrocities in Myanmar ‘cannot be expected’ within its borders – UN investigator

To rebuild trust in the media, we must empower its consumers

The big challenge of leadership and entrepreneurship in Europe

Europe led by Germany seems vulnerable to Trump’s threats

GSMA Announces First Keynote Speakers for 2019 “MWC Los Angeles, in Partnership with CTIA”

Tragedy of Mediterranean deaths continues, as seven drown, 57 rescued: UN migration agency

Yemen: UN Envoy ‘guilty’ of optimistic hope that war is ‘nearing the end’

EU-Ukraine Summit: moving forward together in solidarity

Second Ebola death confirmed in Uganda as UN health agency mulls global emergency call

Under-fives’ daily screen time should be kept to 60 minutes only, warns WHO

Back to school: Schoolchildren to receive milk, fruits and vegetables at school thanks to EU programme

A day in the life of a Rohingya refugee

FROM THE FIELD: Weaving profits in Azerbaijan

Migrant caravan: UN agency helping ‘exhausted’ people home

OECD household income up 0.7% in first quarter of 2018, outpacing GDP growth

European Union presents its progress towards sustainable development

Tax Inspectors Without Borders making significant progress toward strengthening developing countries’ ability to effectively tax multinational enterprises

Korea must enhance detection and reinforce sanctions to boost foreign bribery enforcement

Refugee crisis update: Commission still in panic while Turkey is to be added in the equation

Does the Commission subsidise a forced labour scheme in Britain?

COP21 Breaking News_09 December: List of Recent Climate Funding Announcements

Why the ECB suddenly decided to flood banks with money?

Europe bewildered by radicalisation and terrorism

Climate change is speeding up. Our response needs to be even faster

Syria still suffering ‘staggering levels’ of humanitarian need, Security Council hears

How India is solving its cooling challenge

World’s human rights watchdog spotlights Afghanistan, Yemen and 12 others: Here’s the scoop

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s