Lockdown is the world’s biggest psychological experiment – and we will pay the price

COVID-19+

(Sharon McCutcheon, Unsplash)

This article is brought to you thanks to the collaboration of The European Sting with the World Economic Forum.

Author: Dr Elke Van Hoof, Professor, health psychology and primary care psychology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel


  • With some 2.6 billion people around the world in some kind of lockdown, we are conducting arguably the largest psychological experiment ever;
  • This will result in a secondary epidemic of burnouts and stress-related absenteeism in the latter half of 2020;
  • Taking action now can mitigate the toxic effects of COVID-19 lockdowns.

In the mid-1990s, France was one of the first countries in the world to adopt a revolutionary approach for the aftermath of terrorist attacks and disasters. In addition to a medical field hospital or triage post, the French crisis response includes setting up a psychological field unit, a Cellule d’Urgence Médico-Psychologique or CUMPS.

 

In that second triage post, victims and witnesses who were not physically harmed receive psychological help and are checked for signs of needing further post-traumatic treatment. In those situations, the World Health Organization recommends protocols like R-TEP (Recent Traumatic Episode Protocol) and G-TEP (Group Traumatic Episode Protocol).

Since France led the way more than 20 years ago, international playbooks for disaster response increasingly call for this two-tent approach: one for the wounded and one to treat the invisible, psychological wounds of trauma.

In treating the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is scrambling to build enough tents to treat those infected with a deadly, highly contagious virus. In New York, we see literal field hospitals in the middle of Central Park.

But we’re not setting up the second tent for psychological help and we will pay the price within three to six months after the end of this unprecedented lockdown, at a time when we will need all able bodies to help the world economy recover.

The mental toll of quarantine and lockdown

Currently, an estimated 2.6 billion people – one-third of the world’s population – is living under some kind of lockdown or quarantine. This is arguably the largest psychological experiment ever conducted.

Estimated size of lockdowns around the world
Estimated size of lockdowns around the world
Image: Statista

Unfortunately, we already have a good idea of its results. In late February 2020, right before European countries mandated various forms of lockdowns, The Lancet published a review of 24 studies documenting the psychological impact of quarantine (the “restriction of movement of people who have potentially been exposed to a contagious disease”). The findings offer a glimpse of what is brewing in hundreds of millions of households around the world.

In short, and perhaps unsurprisingly, people who are quarantined are very likely to develop a wide range of symptoms of psychological stress and disorder, including low mood, insomnia, stress, anxiety, anger, irritability, emotional exhaustion, depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Low mood and irritability specifically stand out as being very common, the study notes.

In China, these expected mental health effects are already being reported in the first research papers about the lockdown.

In cases where parents were quarantined with children, the mental health toll became even steeper. In one study, no less than 28% of quarantined parents warranted a diagnosis of “trauma-related mental health disorder”.

Among quarantined hospital staff, almost 10% reported “high depressive symptoms” up to three years after being quarantined. Another study reporting on the long-term effects of SARS quarantine among healthcare workers found a long-term risk for alcohol abuse, self-medication and long-lasting “avoidance” behaviour. This means that years after being quarantined, some hospital workers still avoid being in close contact with patients by simply not showing up for work.

Reasons for stress abound in lockdown: there is risk of infection, fear of becoming sick or of losing loved ones, as well as the prospect of financial hardship. All these, and many more, are present in this current pandemic.

The second epidemic and setting up the second tent online

We can already see a sharp increase in absenteeism in countries in lockdown. People are afraid to catch COVID-19 on the work floor and avoid work. We will see a second wave of this in three to six months. Just when we need all able bodies to repair the economy, we can expect a sharp spike in absenteeism and burnout.

We know this from many examples, ranging from absenteeism in military units after deployment in risk areas, companies that were close to Ground Zero in 9/11 and medical professionals in regions with outbreaks of Ebola, SARS and MERS.

Right before the lockdown, we conducted a benchmark survey among a representative sample of the Belgian population. In that survey, we saw that 32% of the population could be classified as highly resilient (“green”). Only 15% of the population indicated toxic levels of stress (“red”).

How stress under lockdown is affecting Belgians
How stress under lockdown is affecting Belgians

In our most recent survey after two weeks of lockdown, the green portion has shrunk to 25% of the population. The “red” part of the population has increased by 10 percentage points to fully 25% of the population.

These are the people at high risk for long-term absenteeism from work due to illness and burnout. Even if they stay at work, research from Eurofound reports a loss of productivity of 35% for these workers.

In general, we know at-risk groups for long-term mental health issues will be the healthcare workers who are on the frontline, young people under 30 and children, the elderly and those in precarious situations, for example, owing to mental illness, disability and poverty.

All this should surprise no one; insights on the long-term damage of disasters have been accepted in the field of trauma psychology for decades.

The phases of disaster response
The phases of disaster response
Image: When disaster strikes, Beverly Raphael, 1986

But while the insights are not new, the sheer scale of these lockdowns is. This time, ground zero is not a quarantined village or town or region; a third of the global population is dealing with these intense stressors. We need to act now to mitigate the toxic effects of this lockdown.

What is the World Economic Forum doing about the coronavirus outbreak?

A new strain of Coronavirus, COVID 19, is spreading around the world, causing deaths and major disruption to the global economy.

Responding to this crisis requires global cooperation among governments, international organizations and the business community, which is at the centre of the World Economic Forum’s mission as the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation.

The Forum has created the COVID Action Platform, a global platform to convene the business community for collective action, protect people’s livelihoods and facilitate business continuity, and mobilize support for the COVID-19 response. The platform is created with the support of the World Health Organization and is open to all businesses and industry groups, as well as other stakeholders, aiming to integrate and inform joint action.

As an organization, the Forum has a track record of supporting efforts to contain epidemics. In 2017, at our Annual Meeting, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was launched – bringing together experts from government, business, health, academia and civil society to accelerate the development of vaccines. CEPI is currently supporting the race to develop a vaccine against this strand of the coronavirus.

What governments and NGOs can and should do today

There is broad consensus among academics about the psychological care following disasters and major incidents. Here are a few rules of thumb:

  • Make sure self-help interventions are in place that can address the needs of large affected populations;
  • Educate people about the expected psychological impact and reactions to trauma if they are interested in receiving it. Make sure people understand that a psychological reaction is normal;
  • Launch a specific website to address psychosocial issues;
  • Make sure that people with acute issues can find the help that they need

In Belgium, we recently launched Everyone OK, an online tool that tries to offer help to the affected population. Using existing protocols and interventions, we launched our digital self-help tool in as little as two weeks.

When it comes to offering psychological support to their populations, most countries are late to react, as they were to the novel coronavirus. Better late than never.

the sting Milestones

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Nearly 900 reportedly killed following ‘shocking’ intercommunal attacks in DR Congo

Plastic waste from Western countries is poisoning Indonesia

The European Agenda on Migration: EU needs to sustain progress made over the past 4 years

COVID-19: from the chaos of the pandemic to the difficulties in vaccination

Libya on verge of civil war, threatening ‘permanent division’, top UN official warns Security Council

Lebanon: EU delivers additional emergency assistance following the explosion in Beirut

Everyone has ‘a moral imperative’ to uphold the rights of persons with disabilities, says UN chief

IMF: The near-term outlook for the U.S. economy is one of strong growth and job creation

Unemployment and stagnation can tear Eurozone apart if austere policies persist

Primary Healthcare vs Specialization Careers, how to promote PHC to the Young Health Workforce?

This Scottish forest is both a home for wildlife and a boost for the local economy

China Unlimited Special Report: The trip to China

This is how drones and other ‘tradetech’ are transforming international trade

The megatrend that will shape our working future

Palliative care and health coverage: informing is also universalizing

IMF’s Lagarde: Ukraine must fight corruption

Taxes on polluting fuels are too low to encourage a shift to low-carbon alternatives

Western Balkans: An Economic and Investment Plan to support the economic recovery and convergence

Why 2020 is a turning point for cybersecurity

Tougher defence tools against unfair imports to protect EU jobs and industry

Madagascar: UN chief commends leaders, State institutions following ‘historic milestone’ election

Resolving banks with depositors’ money?

Russia to cut gas supplies again: can the EU get back to growth without a solid energy market?

How the future of computing can make or break the AI revolution

Security Council condemns ‘heinous and cowardly’ attack in Iran

Music is a vital urban resource. How do we plan for it?

Digital development: technology-enabled, but human-centric

A third of young people polled by UN, report being a victim of online bullying

EU’s new sanctions on Russia into force “in the next few days”: strength, weakness or strategy?

Meeting the basic needs of our healthcare workers

Is there a cure for corruption in Greece?

UN sees progress in fight against tobacco, warns more action needed to help people quit deadly product

Threats from mammoth banks and Brussels fuel May’s poll rates

Responding to the anger

After Rio Grande tragedy, UNICEF chief highlights ‘dire’ detention centres on US-Mexico border

In the future of work it’s jobs, not people, that will become redundant

Real EU unemployment rate at 10.2%+4.1%+4.7%: Eurostat Update

China’s stock markets show recovery signs while EU is closely watching in anticipation of the €10bn investment

These 4 scenarios show how we might be working in the future

This is how Europe is helping companies and workers as the coronavirus crisis deepens

The good news on pensions: sustainable equals profitable

Science is ‘key’ to pushing forward the 2030 Agenda, UN development forum told

How to end overfishing in the global South

Digital education is both a necessity and an advantage for the Global South. Here’s why

A Sting Exclusive: EU Commission’s Vice President Šefčovič accentuates the importance of innovation to EU’s Energy Union

World Health Organisation and young doctors: is there any place for improvement?

Car-free day – and the other 364 days of the year

Madagascar villagers learn dangers of outdoor defecation

A year on from Yemen talks breakthrough, top UN Envoy hails ‘shift’ towards peace, despite setbacks

These are the countries with the highest inflation

Claude Akpokavie, Senior ILO Adviser:“Engaging in policy debates and organizing workers, are two key challenges faced by unions in Export processing zones”

The West and Russia accomplished the dismembering and the economic destruction of Ukraine

Modernising EU justice systems: New package to speed up digitalisation of justice systems and boost training of justice professionals

DR Congo Ebola outbreak now a Public Health Emergency, UN health agency declares

Donald Tusk presents EU summit conclusions for last time

On Youth Participation: Are we active citizens?

Letter to The European Sting from Italy

Charlotte in Ghana

‘Critical test’ for North Korea’s Government as civilian suffering remains rife, warns UN rights expert

25 years after population conference, women still face challenges to ‘well-being and human rights’, says UN chief

More Stings?

Comments

  1. reference

  2. I need the reference for the literature review of my paper

Leave a Reply to Dr. Anuradha Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s