Brexit: UK to suffer from EU’s uncompromising stance

Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission (second from right), and Michel Barnier, EC Chief negotiator for Article 50 negotiations with the United Kingdom (first from right), participated to the debate on Brexit during the European Parliament Plenary session in Brussels. Date: 30/01/2019. Location: Brussels – European Parliament. © European Union, 2019/Source:EC – Audiovisual Service / Photo: Etienne Ansotte.

Last Tuesday, 29 January, 317 British MPs voted for (301 against) the Tory Sir Graham Brady’s amendment, to replace the ‘Northern Ireland Backstop’ with elusive “alternative arrangements“. This NI Backstop is an integral part of the Brexit Agreement, PM Theresa May concluded with the other 27 EU leaders last December. It guarantees that, after the divorce, there won’t be a hard border on the island of Ireland separating the Irish Republic, a member of the EU, from Northern Ireland, an integral part of the UK. Other than this deal, the EU uncompromisingly considers no other option for a divorce agreement.

In any case, on 15 January, the Commons, the British Parliament, rejected altogether this kind of soft Brexit Agreement of May with Brussels. A round number of 120 MPs of her own Conservative Party defied their leader again, joining the opposition deputies, including the Labor Party, and all of them together voting down May’s soft Brexit proposal by 432 votes to 202.

Blocking the no-deal exit

Before that and envisaging the rejection, two pro ‘remainer’ deputies, a Tory and a Labor, proposed an amendment to forbid a Brexit without an Agreement with Brussels. This amendment was passed with 303 votes for and 296 against.

Obviously, the aim of the Parliamentary majority is to avoid a catastrophic no-deal Brexit at all costs. Everybody agrees that a no-deal Brexit will entail devastating effects for Britain in the coming decades. There is one incomprehensible exception to that. A round number of 120 Tory MPs plus a few other deputies think well about such a prospect.

A Parliament lost in amendments

Let’s try, now, to assess where the British Parliament stands. For one thing, many MPs are not any more afraid to ask for a second referendum, openly defying the result of the 23 June 2016 plebiscite. By the same token, there is a clear majority in the Commons against a wild divorce, even favoring a full revocation, or at least a deferral of the Brexit date well beyond the 29 March. Legally, though, for a real change in the Brexit path, the proposal has to come from the government and be voted by the Parliament. An MP’s amendment cannot do that and doesn’t bind the government.

As a result, only eight weeks before the exit day at the end of next month and the UK Parliament is lost in a maze of red lines and groundless aspirations. The latest vote, approving the completely vague Brady amendment, has perplexed things even further. As mentioned above, 317 MPs voted for it, but not all them come from the same party.

7+8 dissident MPs

This majority included seven Labor MPs, but eight Tories voted against their Conservative colleague’s proposal. Those 7+8 dissident deputies voting against their parties’ lines are proven hard rock antagonists to their party’s leadership. In the case of Tories, the eight rebel MPs are utterly opposing their party’s line for a Brexit, be it soft or hard. In the Labor camp, the seven contestant representatives fully support a full Brexit at any cost, against their party line which favors at least the participation in the EU Customs Union or a second referendum. Presumably, a second plebiscite will reject Brexit altogether.

As for the smaller parties, the Scottish National Party and the Liberals, they are in favor of a soft Brexit, or a no Brexit at all or even a new referendum. The Labor Party’s policy is not fully laid down and its leader Jeremy Corby by and large proposes to remain in the EU’s Customs Union, without however having a detailed plan for that. Understandably, the participation in the EU’s Customs Union doesn’t go for free. There are important obligations that go with it, and Corbyn remains very elusive about that.

A British colony?

In reality, there is not a solid Parliamentary majority for a clear cut solution to the Brexit conundrum. If May really tries to press mainland Europeans to serve her new offer, about “alternative arrangements” for the Irish Backstop as the Brady amendment demands, there will be grave repercussions for Britain. Already, Brussels have started to provoke the UK. A new Regulation is being currently being drafted by the European Commission which contains a phrase characterizing Gibraltar as a “British Colony”.

No matter how deafening the cries of the British Ambassador to the EU, Gibraltar remained a “British Colony” in the relevant text. Obviously, the rest of mainland Europeans have lined behind Spain, in her conflict with Britain about the ‘ownership’ of the Gibraltar Rock. This is a solid indication that the 27 EU countries will not concede to renegotiate May’s Brexit Agreement which they occluded last December.

Brussels will not blink

With mounting problems from the present full Brexit chaos upon the UK business sector, the consequences from a no-deal divorce on 29 March will inflict a historic trauma on Britain. In the latest incident, automaker Nissan is reportedly withholding a major investment in its Sunderland plant. The giant automotive company is about to cancel plans to produce the X-Trail SUV in Britain.

All in all, if some Brits think that the EU will blink before May’s new demands, they will learn the hard way, that in today’s world nobody will miss the opportunity to make a kill. Things are difficult for all and Britain is probably about to pay dearly for that.

 

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

the European Sting Milestones

Featured Stings

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Young people meet in Malta to shape the future of Europe

As human caravan moves through Mexico, ‘full respect’ needed for national control of borders: UN chief

‘Continue working together’ UN chief urges DR Congo, as country heads to polls

World Cancer Day: Early cervical cancer diagnosis could save lives of over 300,000 women

UN launches plan to promote peace, inclusive growth in Africa’s Sahel

UN chief calls for ‘increased commitment’ to resolution on 10th anniversary of Georgia conflict

Eurozone at risk of home-made deflation and recession

UN refugee agency ‘deeply shocked’ at stabbing death of ‘deeply courageous’ Polish mayor

Health Education, is it a necessity?

The Brussels bureaucracy blocks the Youth Guarantee scheme

A Sting Exclusive: “Leading by example! EU must push for UN deal to avoid dangerous climate change”, European Parliament Vice-President Ulrike Lunacek cries out from Brussels

10th ASEM in Milan and the importance of being one: EU’s big challenge on the way to China

How close is the new financial Armageddon? IMF gives some hints

The big five EU telecom operators in dire straights

The Brexit factor in the US-China trade war and other conflicts

Two States ‘side-by-side’ is the ‘peaceful and just solution’ for Israel-Palestine conflict: Guterres

Fresh airstrikes kill dozens in conflict-ravaged Syria

UN and partners appeal for $920 million to meet ‘dire needs’ of Rohingya refugees

Medical Education is #NotATarget

EU Ambassadors in the EP: a multilateral approach to global challenges needed

EU budget: Making the EU fit for its role as strong global actor

The movement of anti-vaccers: taking humanity back 200 years

EU Parliament: Deposit guarantee and trading platform transparency sought

Main results of Environment Council of 09 October 2018

10 cities are predicted to gain megacity status by 2030

Why Italy will not follow the Greek road; Eurozone to change or unravel

Black Panther’s ‘General Okoye’ joins the fight against gender-based violence

MEPs call on EU countries to end precarious employment practices

The battle for the 2016 EU Budget to shake the Union; Commission and Parliament vs. Germany

‘Leaders who sanction hate speech’ encourage citizens to do likewise, UN communications chief tells Holocaust remembrance event

This project in India helps people and tigers co-exist peacefully

ILO’s Bureau for Employers´Activities to publish new study on women in business and management

It’s not summer holidays what lead to the bad August of the German economy

Investing in rural women and girls, ‘essential’ for everyone’s future: UN chief

COP21 Breaking News_03 December: Europe’s children urge leaders to commit to climate action at UN Climate Summit in Paris

European Commissioner for Youth wants young people to be at heart of policy making

The global economy isn’t working for women. Here’s what world leaders must do

Eurozone: Inflation plunge to 0.4% in July may trigger cataclysmic developments

How the United States can win back its manufacturing mojo

EYE to kick off on Friday: 8000+ young people discussing the future of Europe 1 – 2 June

India’s economy is growing fast, but its poorest areas lag behind. Here’s why this could be about to change

EU Copyright Directive: Google News threatens to leave Europe while media startups increasingly worry

Ecofin: ‘The Friday battle’ for the banking union

How fungi could save the world

UN relief official in Yemen condemns ‘horrific’ attack on passenger buses

Nigeria: UN chief ‘appalled’ by killing of aid worker; calls for release of remaining hostages

Germany openly seeks more advantages for its banks

A young student discusses the determinants of migration in the European Union

Erdogan vies to become Middle East Sultan over Khashoggi’s killing

Robots aren’t stealing all our jobs, says the World Bank’s chief economist

EU Budget 2019 deal: EP boosts support for researchers and the young

European Commission recommends to the European Council (Article 50) to find that decisive progress has been made in Brexit negotiations

European Semester Autumn Package: Bolstering inclusive and sustainable growth

Google prepares to final EU judgement over Android antitrust case

800,000 people commit suicide every year: WHO

A day in the life of a Rohingya refugee

‘Well-being of two million’ in Gaza at stake as emergency fuel runs dry: UN humanitarian coordinator

Eurozone slowly but surely builds its Banking Union

The economic cost of anti-vaccination movements in Italy

MWC 2016 LIVE: Mobile World Congress shows off planes, trams and automobiles

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s