Four million Syrian children have only known war since birth: UNICEF

UNICEF/NYHQ2012-0218/Romenzi Syrian children shelter in the doorway of a house, amid gunfire and shelling, in a city affected by the conflict.

This article is brought to you in association with the United Nations.

Half of Syria’s children, that’s four million, have grown up only knowing a life of violence, as the war-battered country enters its eighth year of conflict, the United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) said on Thursday.

“Every eight-year-old in Syria has been growing up amidst danger, destruction and death,” the agency’s Executive Director, Henrietta Fore, explained following a five-day visit to the country.

“These children need to be able to return to school, receive their vaccinations, and feel safe and protected. We need to be able to help them.” Four million children have been born in Syria since the conflict started, which has touched every single part of the country.

In Douma, East Ghouta, just where a Government siege came to an end in April after five years of bombardment, displaced families are returning to the town where the threat of unexploded ordinance is still widespread. Since May 2018, 26 children have reportedly been killed or injured by explosive remnants of war in this one pocket of the country alone.

In March, the UN declared 2017 the deadliest year for Syrian children, when a reported 910 died from the ongoing conflict.  Verification of additional numbers continues, and this data may be “only the tip of the iceberg,” the Syria Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism has said.

Ms. Fore said that in Douma, people are raising their families “amidst the rubble, struggling for water, food and warmth in this winter weather.” Schools are overcrowded and lacking in supplies, she added, and the situation is creating a defensive and mistrustful mindset among children there.

“Since the conflict started, children and young people have become increasingly violent,” one 15-year-old said, who frequents a centre where young girls and boys learn how to stand up against gender-based violence.

“Bullying, harassment, beatings, early marriage—all these forms of violence increased. Children and young people see violence around them everywhere and view it as normal,” she said.

Some 100 kilometers south of Ghouta, in Dera’a City, displacement levels are especially high, and limited access is blocking replenishment of limited resources.

The city’s two main water stations were previously contested areas, causing frequent water shortages and a dependency on water trucks. To remedy the situation, UNICEF has helped lay a 16-kilometer pipe to facilitate safe water transport for some 200,000 people.

First-graders, aged 17

War damage has left at least 500 of the area’s schools in need of repair, and children are missing out on their education. UNICEF said that first-grade students can vary in age from six to 17 years old, and close to a third of students are dropping out of school nationwide.

Ms. Fore said establishing quality education to motivate children to go to school is needed, as this is “where the seeds of social cohesion are first planted.”

UNICEF has underscored that reaching children, wherever they are, and assisting with their immediate and future needs, remains a priority.

With access improving, UNICEF is scaling up its health, nutrition, and child protection support services. This includes aid to schools, implementation of learning programmes to get students who have missed years of education up to speed, teacher training, and sewage and water pipeline repair.

The children’s agency calls for the protection of Syrian children at all times and has renewed its call for unconditional access to hard-to-reach areas.

“Almost eight years since the conflict started, the needs are still great,” Fore said. “But the millions of children born during this war and growing up amidst the violence are ready: they want to learn. They want to play. They want to heal.”

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

the European Sting Milestones

Featured Stings

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Charlie’s tragedy energized deeper feelings amongst Europeans; back to basics?

Changing for the change: Medicine in Industry 4.0

The unique role of business in building social good

UN forum spotlights cities, where struggle for sustainability ‘will be won or lost’

Why is Merkel’s Germany so liberal with the refugees? Did the last elections change that?

Apparently the EU Digital Single Market passes necessarily from China’s Digital Silk Road

Further reforms will promote a more inclusive and resilient Indonesian economy

More bank bailouts at taxpayers’ expenses

Paris is building the world’s greenest business district. What can other cities learn from it?

Financial Transaction Tax: More money for future bank bailouts?

FROM THE FIELD: Finding refuge in the ‘beautiful game’

India is a latecomer to AI. Here’s how it plans to catch up

An FTA between EU-US to hurt South Korea

A European Discovers China: 3 First Impressions

Sudzha gas metering station at Russian-Ukrainian border (Copyright: Gazprom, 2015 / Gazprom’s website, Media)

Gazprom starts suspending gas contracts with Ukraine as Brussels fears limited transit to Europe

EU Leaders’ meeting in Sofia: Completing a trusted Digital Single Market for the benefit of all

The banks first to benefit from the new euro trillion ECB plans to print

EU Youth Conference in Riga concludes with recommendations for ministers

Deal on faster exchange of non-EU nationals’ criminal records

Poverty data never tells the whole story

UN expert ‘shocked’ by Egyptian reprisals against human rights defenders she met

Open, inclusive and diverse cities are better for business and economic growth

ILO warns of widespread insecurity in the global labour market

Conflicts and extreme climate change threatens access to food in 39 countries – UN agriculture report

At last a good price for the Greek debt!

New skills agenda for Europe needs real investment

COP21 Breaking News_03 December: Transport Industry Drive for Improved Energy Efficiency and Electro-Mobility to Stem High Growth of Emissions

Amending Guatemala ‘reconciliation law’ would lead to unjust amnesty, warns Bachelet

Climate change and its adverse impacts on health

Ercom, cutting-edge Telco solutions from Europe

European Confederation of Junior Enterprises hosts in Geneva the Junior Enterprise World Conference

African cities will double in population by 2050. Here are 4 ways to make sure they thrive

Consumers suffer three defeats

The Junior Enterprise concept: Business & Education

Trump rejects Europe’s offer for zero car tariffs; he had personally tabled that idea in July

The time is up but the game is still not over for Greece: negotiations continue in anticipation of a new deal

UN chief condemns killing of ‘blue helmets’ in DR Congo, as violence erupts prior to elections

Guatemala Dos Erres massacre conviction welcomed by UN human rights office

Four major resources for new European young entrepreneurs

Capital Markets Union: Making it easier for smaller businesses to get financing through capital markets

Financiers can turn the world into a dirty and dangerous place

Parliament approves €500 million for schooling of refugee children in Turkey

Businesses can lead a revolution in disability inclusion

Stricter rules and tougher sanctions for market manipulation and financial fraud

EU readies for eventual annulment of the Turkish agreement on immigrants-refugees

YouTube stars get creative at UN, to promote tolerance

International World Summit Award calls for outstanding digital applications with impact on society from 178 UN member states

The Future of Balkans: Embracing Education

European Business Summit 2014: The role of youth entrepreneurship education in EU’s Strategy for Competitiveness

UN chief condemns student abductions in north-west Cameroon

Autonomous vehicles could clog city centres: a lesson from Boston

EU responds to terror fallout by eroding borderless Europe and molesting the refugees

Germany and Europe prepare for Trump’s America

In Washington D.C., Guterres signs pact with World Bank, meets US President Trump

A new proposal breaks the stalemate over the Banking Union

‘Favour dialogue’ over violence, UN chief urges all parties following clashes in Mali’s capital

India’s economy is growing fast, but its poorest areas lag behind. Here’s why this could be about to change

These countries have the highest minimum wages

EU summit: Are the London Tories planning an exit from the EU?

UN rights chief calls for international inquiry into Kashmir violations

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s