EU Summit: Why was Poland isolated in opposing Tusk and the ‘multi speed’ Europe

From left to right: Donald Tusk, President of the European Council and Angela Merkel, German Federal Chancellor. Last week the 27+1 European Union heads of state or government met informally in Brussels .Shoot location: Brussels – Belgium. Shoot date: 10/03/2017. Copyright: European Union.

Until last week’s summit (Thursday and Friday) of the 27+1 European leaders in Brussels, the exit of Britain from the European club was the tougher test for the club’s unity, which everybody was more or less getting ready to face up to. However, the Polish Prime Minister, a stocky middle aged woman, reversed that and stole the show for a very shocking reason.

It was on Thursday when she offloaded her home grown, aggressive and unwarranted attitude against Donald Tusk, her compatriot political opponent, the President of the European Council. On Friday, Poland threatened and came close to destroying the atmosphere of unity, which France and Germany wanted to prevail in the gathering of the 27 leaders. Despite the  Polish MP’s vehement opposition, early on Thursday, Tusk got a new term as EU Council President with all the 27 votes, except Warsaw’s. The next day, Poland also remained alone in opposing the ‘multi speed’ Europe’. Let’s take one thing at a time.

A frantic PM

Before and after Thursday’s vote, the Polish PM Beata Szydlo, authentically broadcasted in Brussels the weird voice of her boss, Jarosław Kaczyński the extreme right-wing, chauvinist, authoritarian and Eurosceptic President of their Law and Justice Party. It seems that Kaczynski cannot remain sane, seeing his political opponent Donald Tusk, presiding over the European Councils. This is probably a good reason why he appointed subservient Beata as Prime Minister, after his party won the October 2015 election, ending a seven years Tusk Premiership. Seemingly, Kaczynski couldn’t attend the EU Summits as a ‘simple Prime Minister’ under the Presidency of his political opponent Tusk.

During the past months, Tusk, expressing a general EU sentiment, kept criticizing the Law and Justice Party for a number of apparently undemocratic and unconstitutional laws, which flagrantly breach the relevant EU legislation. Kaczyński’s laws are aimed at extending his party’s grip on pivotal state institutions, like the Constitutional Court and the public television. Such overtly authoritarian government action has attracted strong criticism from within and without Poland.

Poland in discomfort

In the brief period of some months under the Law and Justice party, this country has become the ‘denier’ of Europe, despite the extra generous EU subsidies Poland receives, to modernize her infrastructures in all sectors of the economy. It was exactly this reality that the French President Francois Hollande reminded Szydlo, in a very poignant intervention. The outgoing French President actually told Szydlo to stop biting the hand that feeds her.

However, the Polish PM increased her aggressive tone on Friday, while speaking to journalists. During this second day of the summit, the 27 EU leaders met without the presence of the British MP Theresa May. Szydlo though, continued on the same hostile stance, even knowing that the most important task for the EU Council on that day was to display unity. This is a necessity because by the end of March, Britain is expected to energize Article 50 of the EU Treaty, to kick start the exit procedure. In detail, on Friday, the 27 leaders had  to prepare the new ‘Declaration of Rome’ to be signed on the 25 of this month, to celebrate the 60th birthday of the EU, after the first ‘Declaration of Rome’ was signed on 25 March 1957.

Isolating Warsaw

Theoretically, this occasion had to be an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between the 27 member states. But quite surprisingly it didn’t, because the ‘directoire’ of the EU had planned otherwise, in order to pacify the ‘deniers’. In this way, it turned out to be a new test for the central European EU member states and more so Poland. Jean-Claude Juncker the European Commission President, Angela Merkel, the Chancellor of Germany and more so the outgoing President of France Francois Hollande only hours before last weeks’ summit and ahead of the Rome ‘randez vous’, all chose to stress in the most solemn way, that the future of the EU lies in the ‘multiple speeds’ EU architecture.

This proposal or rather the reality of a stratified EU is not new in Brussels. In the past, we had the ‘concentric cycles’ architecture and of course the exclusive 19 member states Eurozone. Given the fact that the central European member states, the ex-communist ‘Visegrad four’ (Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia) have recently been very aggressive against Brussels and Berlin over the immigration crisis, the new ‘multiple speed’ theory is clearly primarily targeted on them. This is a direct challenge for the four above mentioned countries, with Poland the largest and more important amongst them. By the way, the four southerners Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal despite being under pressure on many fronts, ‘de facto’ belong to the first speed of the EU, as members of the euro area.

Beata left alone

It’s highly probable then, that the rough time the Polish PM had last week in Brussels, was staged by a Brussels-Berlin-Paris scenario, to bring out the worst self of the Warsaw’s rulers. This kind of drama was the best way, to convince the other Visegrad members to accept the ‘multi speed’ theory, as an absolutely necessary new EU ‘geometry’. On the background of the appalling Polish fury, the rest of the Visegrad countries took their distances and isolated Warsaw. It seems that this was the most important result of the latest EU summit.

Poland remained alone in the first day, when even Britain denied supporting Warsaw’s governing extremists and voted for Tusk. In the second day, when Szydlo stated that in Rome she will not support a ‘Declaration’ dividing the EU in many speeds, the other three of the Visegrad group rushed to reassure Brussels and Berlin that they will not follow Poland in her solitary road.

In conclusion, the March 2017 seems to set a new landmark in the EU history. Not only Britain is to officially ask to leave the EU club, but also another big country, Poland may be ostracized from the European project, if its leadership continues in their reclusive course.

 

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

How COVID-19 is taking gaming and esports to the next level

EU and Airbus Member States take action to ensure full compliance in the WTO aircraft dispute

Scores of Rohingya refugee shelters in Bangladesh destroyed by flooding

Finland, Switzerland and New Zealand lead the way at teaching skills for the future

The COP24 Agreement: Yes, it happened at last

Chinese tech investors are turning towards MENA. Here’s why

Africa-Europe Alliance: first projects kicked off just three months after launch

While EU Open Days 2013 discuss the 2020 strategy, Microsoft shares a glimpse of EU 2060

Rohingya crisis: EU allocates €31 million for Bangladesh and Myanmar

The European Commission to stop Buffering

Australia’s bushfires have pumped out half a year’s CO2 emissions

Scientists are using machine learning to unlock the mysteries of long-dead languages

Stronger European Border and Coast Guard to secure EU’s borders

How 5G can connect the affordable homes of the future

Draghi reveals how failing banks will be dealt, may cut interest rates soon

Human Rights: breaches in Cambodia, Uganda and Myanmar

Ukraine takes EU money and runs to sign with Russia

It’s time to ‘eliminate the scourge of conflict-related sexual violence’, urges UN chief

UN Climate Action Summit concludes with insufficient EU and global pledges

UN Human Rights Council stands firm on LGBTI violence, Syria detainees and Philippines ‘war on drugs’

Support ‘winds of change’ in DR Congo to consolidate positive developments, urges UN mission chief

Will Merkel ever steer the EU migration Titanic and restore her power in Germany?

Consumers’ rights against defective digital content agreed by EU lawmakers

Greenery: the miracle cure for urban living

How to beat gender stereotypes: learn, speak up and react

DR Congo: Following second brutal assault on Ebola clinic, UN health chief vows to continue serving ‘most vulnerable’

Commission’s Youth Initiative fails first hurdle by not sufficiently consulting young people

Will the EU be condemned by the International Criminal Court for violating migrants’ human rights?

Conflict diamonds and climate change: Cooperate, don’t compete over natural resources urges Guterres

It’s time to fulfil the promises made to women 25 years ago

Statement by the Brexit Steering Group on UK paper on EU citizens in the UK

Summer 2019 Economic Forecast: Growth clouded by external factors

European Union signs aviation agreement with the Republic of Korea

These cities score an ‘A’ for environmental action – but hundreds more are falling behind

UN chief welcomes power-sharing deal between Sudanese military and opposition

Fake news: What it is, and how to spot it

Energy: new ambitious targets on renewables and energy efficiency

Brexit: With May gone the Tory divide is to sink the UK despite Brits wanting to ‘Remain’

Budget MEPs approve €104.2 m in EU aid to Greece, Spain, France and Portugal

ILO: Unemployment to increase by 8.1 million in 2013-2014

A Europe that delivers: EU citizens expect more EU level action in future

What if big-tech companies became non-profits?

Microsoft says the internet is getting a little nicer

European Commission adopts rules to ensure a smooth transition to its next President and the next College of Commissioners

Macron crowned king of Europe in Washington D.C.; just a working meeting with Trump for Merkel

Central America: drought, resulting crop losses threaten food security of two million people, UN warns

MEPs propose measures to combat mobbing and sexual harassment

Million across Yemen ‘just a step away from famine’, with food available but inaccessible

Financing fossil fuels risks a repeat of the 2008 crash. Here’s why

The Commission calls for a climate neutral Europe by 2050*

World Health Organization calls crisis meeting over deadly Ebola outbreak in DR Congo

UN chief welcomes re-opening of key Gaza border crossing

How cities are failing to be inclusive – and what they can do about it

Saudi Arabia must halt air strikes in Yemen, says UN panel

A Sting Exclusive: “Cybersecurity: Why consumer products must be looked at urgently”, by BEUC’s Deputy Director General

A sterilised EMU may lead to a break up of Eurozone

Aviation Safety: Commission adopts new EU Air Safety List

France is building a village for people with Alzheimer’s

A giant marine heatwave has descended on Alaska

Coronavirus COVID-19 wipes $50 billion off global exports in February alone, as IMF pledges support for vulnerable nations

More Stings?

Advertising

Trackbacks

  1. […] Until last week’s summit (Thursday and Friday) of the 27+1 European leaders in Brussels, the exit of Britain from the European club was the tougher test for the club’s unity, which everybody was more or less getting ready to face up to. However, the Polish Prime Minister, a stocky middle aged woman, reversed that and stole the show for a very shocking reason, The European Sting reports. […]

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s