Climate change will never be combatted by EU alone while some G20 countries keep procrastinating

Press conference by Miguel Arias Cañete, Member of the EC, on the preparations under way ahead of COP21/CM11 (EC Audiovisual Services, 20/08/2015)

Press conference by Miguel Arias Cañete, Member of the EC, on the preparations under way ahead of COP21/CM11 (EC Audiovisual Services, 20/08/2015)

The EU Commissioner of Climate Action and Energy stressed out yesterday the sluggishness of the required actions that must be taken in order to combat climate change effects. Miguel Arias Cañete was critical to some G20 countries that have not yet provided their climate contributions and are not helping to create a constructive agreement.

The Commission’s official made it clear from Brussels that there is an absolute need to reduce the length of the 85-page draft agreement and narrow the options down. It is of great importance that everyone starts working immediately for the next climate agreement which will target at the temperature’s rise of more than two degrees Celsius.

Despite the pioneer fight of the EU against climate change, it seems that is alone in a context of 195 countries in the Kyoto Protocol which has as main idea to tackle global warming created by man-made CO2 emissions.

However, Europe should not stop there but continue its tasks urging every EU member state to reduce CO2 emissions and also provide financial aid to other non-EU countries that cannot tackle this long-lasting problem on their own.

EU “points the finger” to big emerging economies

Miguel Arias Cañete at a press conference that took place in Brussels, stressed the fact that many alterations to the climate change issue must be done before attending the Paris climate conference in December. More specifically, the EU Commissioner mentioned that: “In the negotiating rooms, progress has been painfully slow. The technical talks are seriously lagging behind the political discussion and this must change. The window of opportunity to meet our target of keeping the global temperature rise below 2 degrees is closing fast.”

Moreover, the submission of targets for reducing global greenhouse-gas emissions are not on the table by some of the biggest economies such as Argentina, Brazil, India, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia and Turkey. The aforementioned emerging economies are contributing to the global emissions to a great extent and is of vital importance to present their climate plans as soon as possible in order to be evaluated at the Paris Conference.

Cut down the 85-page draft agreement

The text that was written by all countries’ proposals is still too long to be characterised as constructive and options must be narrowed down in order to have a sustainable document that is affordable. “When it comes to substance, the text is still far too long, with all options put forward by countries still on the table. This has to be negotiated as soon as possible,” the Commissioner of the Climate Action added during his speech.

All the countries involved in this agreement should focus only on solutions that have a direct effect on the rise of the temperature that comes from greenhouse gas emissions. Further, the text has to contain analytical actions on how and who is going to provide financial aid to the countries that contribute negatively to the climate change but cannot reduce their emissions on their own.

EU is fighting climate change alone

It is clear that the Old Continent has practically shown its will to reverse the climate change that humans have caused. In detail, the EU is the only major economy that will truly and seriously try reduce emissions by at least 40% by 2030 compared to 1990 levels, which is anyway quite ambitious in comparison to biggest economies such as the US which has announced to cut emissions by between 26% to 28% from 2005 levels over the next 10 years.

What is more, China, India, and the United States have all signaled in Lima in 2014 that they will not sign any agreement that will commit them legally to reduce CO2 emissions, something that makes things a lot worse for the environment and for the anticipated deal.

All in all, the EU, in an attempt to promote its values of protecting the climate at all costs, is trying to put pressure on the rest of the world to join this fight but does not seem to be able to persuade them. Thus, despite the desperate warnings of the scientists, the rise of the temperature will keep on heartrending governments as well as citizens at a global and personal level.

All the above make the next international INDC forum on 12-13 October in Rabat, Morocco to be crucial for the negotiations and the achievement of the next climate agreement in Paris.

the sting Milestones

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Accountability for atrocities in Myanmar ‘cannot be expected’ within its borders – UN investigator

Here’s what keeps CEOs awake at night (and why it might be bad news for your next job)

Closing the gaps in accelerating women’s rights: the role of medical students

DiscoverEU: 15,000 travel passes up for grabs to explore the EU this summer

The European Parliament double-checks the EU 2014-2020 budget

Online radio and news broadcasts: Parliament and Council reach deal

The deforestation risks lurking in the banking sector

A renewed multilateralism fit for the 21st century: the EU’s agenda

Ebola in DR Congo: UN chief ‘outraged’ by recent killings of civilians and health workers

Europe faces economic turmoil as Italy gets closer to the Excessive Debt Procedure

What do toilets have to do with climate change?

Half the world’s population is still offline. Here’s why that matters

Microsoft says the internet is getting a little nicer

Sweden gives all employees time off to be entrepreneurs

This is how CO2 can be transformed into food for animals

UN genocide adviser welcomes historic conviction of former Khmer Rouge leaders

Global OECD welcomes Colombia as its 37th Member

From me to we: COVID-19 heralds a new model of entrepreneurship

Yemen update: UNICEF chief condemns attack in Taiz that claims lives of seven children

Permanent structured cooperation (PESCO) on the table of NATO Defense Ministers amid US concerns

‘Preserve, revitalize and promote’ indigenous languages, or lose a ‘wealth of traditional knowledge’, UN chief says

1 in 7 people would choose not to fly because of climate change

COP21 Breaking News_05 December: Carbon Price Needed for Climate Change Success

These countries are making ‘travel bubbles’ for post-lockdown tourism

As Houthi forces withdraw from key Yemeni ports, UN monitoring chief welcomes ‘first practical step on the ground’

How technology helped Serbia save 180 million sheets of paper in less than 4 years

UN peacekeepers warn of increasing global challenges

GSMA Mobile 360 Series – MENA in Dubai, in Association with The European Sting

Migration and rule of law on next ACP-EU Parliamentary Assembly agenda

Closing the global gender gap – whose job is it anyway?

Sexuality and ageing: challenges of achieving sexual rights in people with HIV

ECB reaches the boundaries of its mandate to revive the entirety of Eurozone

ILO warns of widespread insecurity in the global labour market

A record number of people will need help worldwide during 2020: Global Humanitarian Overview

EU Trust Fund for Africa: Can it be beneficial for Italy and tackle the migration crisis in the Mediterranean?

Business is a crucial partner in solving the mental health challenge

From G7 announcement in August to Paris Peace Forum, Business for Inclusive Growth (B4IG) coalition gains momentum

World Youth Skills Day: What you need to know for 2020

UN chief ‘deeply concerned’ by military escalation in northwest Syria

ESCALAR: up to €1.2 billion to help high potential companies grow and expand in Europe

Car industry: New rules on cleaner and safer cars start to apply across Europe

Media freedom: EP warns of attempts to silence critics and undermine pluralism

ECB doesn’t dare touch Eurozone’s big banks

On our way to China

EU’s Finance Ministers draft plan to raise tax bills of online giants like Google and Amazon

Australian solar could power Singapore within a decade

COVID-19 : Have we learnt any lessons at all from last year?

UN food agency begins ‘last resort’ partial withdrawal of aid to opposition-held Yemeni capital

Are the G20 leaders ready to curb corporate tax-avoidance?

These countries are pioneering hydrogen power

Number of members in Parliament’s committees to change after Brexit

Don’t underestimate the power of the fintech revolution

UK’s PM Theresa May asks for a two-year Brexit transition plan as negotiations round kicks off

Sustainable development demands a broader vision, says new OECD Development Centre report

Eurozone again whipped by Greek winds

Clean energy will do to gas what gas has done to coal

Belarus, climate action, COVID-19: MEPs assess EU summit results

UN appeals for international support as flood waters rise in wake of second Mozambique cyclone

System value can power the energy transition in emerging markets

Telemedicine in Brazilian favelas: The medicine of social isolation transforming public health

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s