Young and unemployed the perfect victims of ‘vultures’

From left to right: Laszlo Andor, Member of the European Commission; Richard Bruton, Irish Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation; Herman Van Ropmuy, President of the Council of the EU, meeting for the EPSCO Council (Employment and Social Affairs). The Council reached political agreement on the establishment of youth guarantee schemes by member states. 28/02/2013, (Council of the European Union photographic library).

From left to right: Laszlo Andor, Member of the European Commission; Richard Bruton, Irish Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation; Herman Van Ropmuy, President of the Council of the EU, meeting for the EPSCO Council (Employment and Social Affairs). The Council reached political agreement on the establishment of youth guarantee schemes by member states. 28/02/2013, (Council of the European Union photographic library).

Slowly, but surely, unemployment in Eurozone keeps rising, posing growing pressures on economic policy planners all over the European Union. The problem has taken devastating dimensions in Eurozone countries applying the EU-ECB-IMF financial rehabilitation programmes (Greece, Portugal and Ireland), or self-imposed austerity measures as in Spain and Italy. More particularly in Greece, Spain, Portugal and to a lesser degree in Italy, unemployment has already undermined social cohesion and now threatens the political stability.

According to Eurostat, the EU statistical service, more people were without employment in January 2013. In detail, “The euro area (EA17) seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate was 11.9% in January 2013, up from 11.8% in December 2012. The EU27 unemployment rate was 10.8%, up from 10.7% in the previous month. In both zones, rates have risen markedly compared with January 2012, when they were 10.8% and 10.1% respectively”.

Unemployed 100%

As for the deep discrepancy between ‘north’ and south’, unemployment differences gradually take unbelievable dimensions. According to the same source, “Among the Member States, the lowest unemployment rates were recorded in Austria (4.9%), Germany and Luxembourg (both 5.3%) and the Netherlands (6.0%), and the highest in Greece (27.0% in November 2012), Spain (26.2%) and Portugal (17.6%)”. No need for someone to be social scientist, to understand why Greece, Spain, Portugal and of course Italy are in such a bad social and political shape.

If percentages cannot tell the entire story, absolute numbers paint a wasteland image. Not to forget that if for the many an 11.8% unemployment percentage is a disappointment, for the unemployed it is a 100% catastrophe. The numbers published are quoted here, “Eurostat estimates that 26.217 million men and women in the EU27, of whom 18.998 million were in the euro area, were unemployed in January 2013”.

The labour market landscape becomes completely frightening when Eurostat starts counting the unemployed young people, bellow the age of 25. “In January 2013, the youth unemployment rate was 23.6% in the EU27 and 24.2% in the euro area, compared with 22.4% and 21 .9% respectively in January 2012. In January 2013 the lowest rates were observed in Germany (7.9%), Austria (9.9%) and the Netherlands (10.3%), and the highest in Greece (59.4% in November 2012), Spain (55.5%) and Italy (38.7%)”.  No wonder why Greece, Spain and Italy pose the gravest problems, risking to derail the whole Eurozone.

A Brussels’ scheme

It seems that in view of this Eurostat publication, the European Union bureaucracy rushed to remind us of its new programme to confront the unemployment of the young. According to a Council of the European Union announcement, “On 28 February 2013, the Council reached a political agreement on the establishment of youth guarantee schemes which aim to ensure that unemployed young people are quickly offered employment or training. All young people under the age of 25 who lose their job or do not find work after leaving school should receive a good-quality offer of employment, continued education, an apprenticeship or a traineeship within 4 months. Member states should implement the schemes as soon as possible, preferably as from 2014”.

It is a scheme which at first reading looks alright, especially if you are not under 25 and unemployed. If you belong, however, in this unfortunate category and already have experienced those schemes, you either laugh or cry. Only recently, a British Court ruled that the widely advertised for effectiveness multi billion pound British government scheme for young unemployed, was illegal. By god, how can such a scheme be illegal? Not difficult, give money to bureaucrats to help the young unemployed and see what happens. Let’s see what happened.

Working unpaid!

In reality, this British programme was not designed to help the unemployed, but rather to cut their benefits. Under this British programme, young people receiving unemployment benefits had to accept any job WITHOUT PAYMENT, if they wanted to keep the allowance. In this affair there was, of course, need for ‘flexible’ private firms, who wanted to have in their workforce UNPAID SLAVES, not regular workers. The ‘circus’ was called ‘on the job training’.

Of course, this was a gift from the bureaucrats to those firms and God knows if there were not some kickbacks, while picking the firms to be favoured with unpaid labour force. Finally, a young woman took her case to the Courts and she won this decision, defining the programme as illegal, because it was forcing young people to unpaid labour, under the false pretext of ‘on the job training’.

This new European Union programme looks exactly like that. Here is why. Given that, realistically speaking, it’s impossible to give jobs for all those millions of unemployed youngsters, the next thing will be to offer them ‘training’ on the job or otherwise. Then it is exactly the idea of training, some member states like Britain might have, that makes the whole affair smell fishy.

If it is about real training no problem, but what if it is a compulsory scheme for young unemployed, to work unpaid if they want to keep or receive allowances? Can the Brussels’ bureaucrats make sure that things, in some member states, will not turn to that? Or even worse, do they care if things will develop like that? This British ‘scheme’ was co-financed by Brussels. Is it possible that the EU policy makers knew nothing about it? If such things happen to Britain, what about other countries with not so good administrative practices? How can the youngsters be protected from abuses? Unemployment and poverty makes them perfect victims to everything. Even their concentration in one place draws the attention of the ‘vultures’. That’s why the Brussels bureaucrats must think twice when they plan for the young. Incidentally, last time in Brussels the only birds I saw were black crows…

 

 

 

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

the sting Milestone

Featured Stings

Can we feed everyone without unleashing disaster? Read on

These campaigners want to give a quarter of the UK back to nature

How to build a more resilient and inclusive global system

Stopping antimicrobial resistance would cost just USD 2 per person a year

Parliament adopts its position on digital copyright rules

On Youth Education: “Just a normal day in the life of a medical student”

The green hydrogen revolution has started, and it won’t be stopped

Varna (Bulgaria) awarded European Youth Capital 2017

Ebola: EU provides an additional €30 million to tackle the outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Tuesday’s Daily Brief: prizewinning journalists freed in Myanmar, new tracking tool for suspected terrorists, and a global bid to stop snakebite deaths

Mental health and suicide prevention: the contradictory access in a reference city of southern Brazil

First Western Sahara talks at UN in six years, begin in Geneva

Killing of aid worker in Syria part of ‘disturbing trend’

Drones are saving lives in Tanzania’s remote communities

“Leaked” TTIP document breaks post 8th negotiations round silence and opens door to critics

Here are three technology trends changing the way you travel

UN’s Bachelet rejects Sri Lankan official’s ‘spin’ on Human Rights Council encounter, urges reforms

Don’t let smoking steal life’s breathtaking moments, urges UN health agency

Eurozone plans return to growth

Afghanistan: UN condemns blasts that leave 8 dead at cricket stadium

These are the 5 most exciting cycling projects in the world

MEPs and European Youth Forum call on EU to Invest in Youth

LGBT community in Chechnya faces ‘new wave of persecution’: UN human rights experts

UN launches Facebook Messenger-powered bot to take on climate change

Why we need artists who strive for social change

Botswana has decriminalized gay sex. But, it’s still illegal in 70 countries

French elections: by the time the EU economy revives and the migration crisis is solved extremists could take over Europe

Estonian Prime Minister Ratas: Europe is a thought that must become a feeling

UN Children’s Fund chief condemns ‘horrific’ Kabul bomb attack

The age of influence: why digital platforms must come clean about political ads

Council’s position on Visa Directive a step back for young people’s mobility

Posting of workers: final vote on equal pay and working conditions

European welfare states are failing young people

How the future of computing can make or break the AI revolution

Google prepares to final EU judgement over Android antitrust case

Chart of the Day: These are the world’s most innovative economies

Greece and Ukraine main items on EU28 menu; the course is set

New citizenship law in India ‘fundamentally discriminatory’: UN human rights office

This AI trash can is designed to stop you wasting food

WEF Davos 2016 LIVE: “CO2 is not the problem, it is the symptom”, the pilots who crossed the world using solar energy cry out from Davos

It’s just electronic cigarette, don’t worry?

Teamgum @ TheNextWeb 2014

South Korea: A cherished partner for the EU

The EU launches € 1 billion plan on supercomputers and tries to catch-up with competitors

The sad show of Brexit

India is investing more money in solar power than coal for first time

This is the critical number that shows when housing breaks down

How energy infrastructure is shaping geopolitics in East Asia

EU Parliament: Deposit guarantee and trading platform transparency sought

EU summit: Are the London Tories planning an exit from the EU?

Is Eurozone heading towards a long stagnation?

Movius @ MWC14: Discussing novel Communications Applications over a “CAFÉ”

Could the EU’s ban on palm oil in biofuels do more harm than good?

The metamorphosis of the categorical imperative in medical students

Why the Fourth Industrial Revolution needs more arts graduates

This digital currency could build a more sustainable global economy

Key Brazilian border crossing for Venezuela refugees reopens as asylum numbers pass last year’s total

Indonesia has a plan to deal with its plastic waste problem

An EU first: youth Ministers debate youth participation in live broadcast

Britain aligns with EU rivaling US on trade and Iran, abandons bilateral ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream’

Guterres holds ‘focused and frank’ informal discussions over future of Cyprus

UN’s Grandi slams ‘toxic language of politics’ aimed at refugees, migrants

Rich economies not a promise of education equality, new report finds

More Stings?

Speak your Mind Here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s